Chapeter 4 Philosophy

29 Questions | Total Attempts: 12

Settings
Please wait...
Philosophy Quizzes & Trivia

Philosophy is a way in which we try to get an explanation or answer to some matters such as existence. Are you a philosophy student who is looking for the answer on about the nature of human thought, the nature of the universe, and the connections between them? Take up the quiz below and see how much of chapter 4 you got to understand. All the best of luck!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Alzheimer's Disease:
    • A. 

      A non reversible, degenerative disease of the central nervous system typically afflicting the elderly and bringing on dementia. Named for the german physician, Alois Alzheimer.

    • B. 

      A quality or property belonging to a person or thing

    • C. 

      To be aware. As used by Locke in this episode, an awareness of the operation of a mental faculty.

  • 2. 
    Attribute:
    • A. 

      Difficult to capture, to find, to understand.

    • B. 

      A quality or property belonging to a person or thing

    • C. 

      Deterioration of mental faculties due to organic brain disorders

  • 3. 
    Consciousness:
    • A. 

      Deterioration of mental faculties due to organic brain disorders

    • B. 

      Difficult to capture, to find, to understand.

    • C. 

      A quality or property belonging to a person or thing

  • 4. 
    Dementia:
    • A. 

      Difficult to capture, to find, to understand.

    • B. 

      Deterioration of mental faculties due to organic brain disorders

    • C. 

      To persist. In the sense of an enduring self to remain the same self over time while allowing for some changes without losing one's identity or self.

  • 5. 
    Elusive:
    • A. 

      Deterioration of mental faculties due to organic brain disorders

    • B. 

      Deterioration of mental faculties due to organic brain disorders

    • C. 

      Difficult to capture, to find, to understand.

  • 6. 
    Enduring:
    • A. 

      Deterioration of mental faculties due to organic brain disorders

    • B. 

      To persist. In the sense of an enduring self to remain the same self over time while allowing for some changes without losing one's identity or self.

    • C. 

      Difficult to capture, to find, to understand.

  • 7. 
    Idea:
    • A. 

      That which either individualizes us or marks a person or thing as being the same over time. Concerned with re-identification.

    • B. 

      For David Hume, a copy of an impression which is thereby less lively and vivid than an impression

    • C. 

      An erroneous perception or sense experience

  • 8. 
    Identity:
    • A. 

      An erroneous perception or sense experience

    • B. 

      That which either individualizes us or marks a person or thing as being the same over time. Concerned with re-identification.

    • C. 

      For David Hume our lively, immediate perceptions

  • 9. 
    Illusion:
    • A. 

      For David Hume our lively, immediate perceptions

    • B. 

      An erroneous perception or sense experience

    • C. 

      Looking inward to the contents of one's own mind or mental experiences.

  • 10. 
    Impression:
    • A. 

      An erroneous perception or sense experience

    • B. 

      Looking inward to the contents of one's own mind or mental experiences.

    • C. 

      For David Hume our lively, immediate perceptions

  • 11. 
    Interspection:
    • A. 

      Looking inward to the contents of one's own mind or mental experiences.

    • B. 

      An erroneous perception or sense experience

    • C. 

      For David Hume our lively, immediate perceptions

  • 12. 
    Imperishable:
    • A. 

      Who each of us is, our identity

    • B. 

      An erroneous perception or sense experience

    • C. 

      Indestructible, non perishable

  • 13. 
    Memory:
    • A. 

      Indestructible, non perishable

    • B. 

      The mental faculty which enables us to recall past experiences or a recalled past experience.

    • C. 

      An erroneous perception or sense experience

  • 14. 
    Self:
    • A. 

      An erroneous perception or sense experience

    • B. 

      Me

    • C. 

      Who each of us is, our identity

  • 15. 
    The belief in an enduring self is a claim that the self:
    • A. 

      Is an illusion

    • B. 

      Remains the same through change

    • C. 

      Is an integration created by the brain

    • D. 

      Is a construction of language

  • 16. 
    Plato raised some skeptical concerns about an enduring self because:
    • A. 

      All parts of our body and soul change dramatically over time

    • B. 

      All knowledge was doubtful

    • C. 

      Is a construction of language

  • 17. 
    Which of the following belief system tends to support the view of an enduring self?
    • A. 

      Legal systems

    • B. 

      Religious system

    • C. 

      Moral systems

    • D. 

      All of the above

  • 18. 
    For Rene' Descrates the self was:
    • A. 

      Ever elusive

    • B. 

      Known for certain

    • C. 

      Only an illusion

  • 19. 
    Some philosophers including John Locke, have argued that personal identity or samenes of self resides in?
    • A. 

      Having the same body

    • B. 

      Immortality

    • C. 

      Continuity of memory

  • 20. 
    According to David Hume, if the self is to be known then it known through
    • A. 

      Perception

    • B. 

      Mystical experience

    • C. 

      Introspection

  • 21. 
    According to David Hume, we have:
    • A. 

      A vivid and lively idea of an enduring self

    • B. 

      No constant and invariable idea of an enduring self

    • C. 

      Mystical experience

  • 22. 
    Some modern neurological accounts consider the notion of an enduring self to be:
    • A. 

      An illusory integration created by the brain

    • B. 

      A religious object beyond scientific investigation

    • C. 

      A mental substance better studied by meta physicians

  • 23. 
    Some contemporary philosophical views have argued that our idea of an enduring self is better understood as:
    • A. 

      A construction of language

    • B. 

      A religious object beyond philosophical reflection

    • C. 

      An object of psychic research

  • 24. 
    The Japanese rock garden of the Ryoan-Ji temple in Kyoto suggests that the self is:
    • A. 

      Illusory and unreal

    • B. 

      Elusive but real

    • C. 

      Real but stone cold

  • 25. 
    A person always remains the same person even when the person has total amnesis
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 26. 
    The Philosopher Diotima argued that "unlike the gods, a mortal creature cannot remain the same throughout eternity."
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 27. 
    Descartes wrote that "if I should wholly cease to think...I should at the same time all together cease to be."
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 28. 
    Locke held that what makes a person at one time the same person he is at a later time, is the fact that he continues to the same soul
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False

  • 29. 
    According to the Buddha, the idea of an enduring self is an illusion that produces suffering and egoism.
    • A. 

      True

    • B. 

      False