Cell Injury Questions: Trivia Quiz

24 Questions | Total Attempts: 331

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Cell Injury Questions: Trivia Quiz

Cell injury questions: trivia quiz. The cells are the building block of living things and they number in millions. This means that when one gets sick of there is a negative change in and outside of the cell environment the cell will get injured or damaged. The cell therefore sends out a message for repair proteins to resolve the issue. Take the quiz and get to test out what you know about cell injury.


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A pathologist notes the following findings after light microscopic examination of a section of liver from a chronic alcoholic. Which of the following is an example of a reversible injury?
    • A. 

      Pyknosis

    • B. 

      Cytoplasmic vacuoles

    • C. 

      Rupture of cell membrane

    • D. 

      Karyolysis

    • E. 

      Karyorrhexis

  • 2. 
     You are asked to review an electron micrograph  of a section of liver from a chronic alcoholic Which of the following is an example of an irreversible injury?
    • A. 

      Cellular edema

    • B. 

      Chromatin clumping

    • C. 

      Cytoplasmic inclusions

    • D. 

      Mitochondrial swelling

    • E. 

      Rupture of cell membrane

  • 3. 
     A patient is admitted with severe substernal chest pain of 4 hours duration. Lab tests reveal an increased level of serum creatine kinase.  This is most likely due to:
    • A. 

      Mitochondrial swelling

    • B. 

      Nuclear lysis

    • C. 

      Damage of plasma membranes

    • D. 

      Increased endoplasmic reticulum

    • E. 

      Increased golgi activity

  • 4. 
    You are asked to review a liver biopsy from a patient with a history of alcohol abuse. Which of the following pathologic changes will most likely lead to the death of hepatocytes and liver cirrhosis? 
    • A. 

      Fatty change in liver cells

    • B. 

      Hydropic change of hepatocytes

    • C. 

      Karyolysis in myocardial cells

    • D. 

      Glycogen deposition in hepatocyte nuclei

  • 5. 
    A pathologist notes that a biopsy from the lung of living patients shows the morphologic changes indicative of irreversible injury and cell death. Which of the following is most likely responsible for cell death in a living body? 
    • A. 

      Cytolysis

    • B. 

      Necrosis

    • C. 

      Putrefaction

    • D. 

      Autolysis

    • E. 

      Somatic death

  • 6. 
    You are asked to participate in a research project on myocardial infarctions in a rat model. Which of the following occurs in ischemic cell injury?
    • A. 

      Efflux of K+ and Na+

    • B. 

      Influx of K+ and Ca++

    • C. 

      Influx of K+ and H2O

    • D. 

      Influx of Na+ and Ca++

    • E. 

      Influx of Na+ and K+

  • 7. 
    Cell death caused by autolysis is produced by
    • A. 

      Antibodies

    • B. 

      Endogenous enzymes

    • C. 

      Phagocytic leukocytes

    • D. 

      Bacterial enzymes

    • E. 

      Anoxia

  • 8. 
    A 10-year-old black man with a known history of sickle cell disease presents to the emergency department complaining of left upper quadrant pain suggestive of a splenic infarct. The microscopic examination of the spleen would most likely reveal.
    • A. 

      Caseous necrosis

    • B. 

      Coagulative necrosis

    • C. 

      Fibrinoid necrosis

    • D. 

      Gangrenous necrosis

    • E. 

      Liquefactive necrosis

  • 9. 
    A pathologist notes cloudy swelling, hydropic change, and fatty change in the liver of a patient with a history of alcohol abuse.These morphological changes are all examples of
    • A. 

      Early neoplastic change

    • B. 

      Hyaline change

    • C. 

      Patterns of cell death

    • D. 

      Postmortem artefact

    • E. 

      Reversible cell injury

  • 10. 
    Which of the following is an example of an agent capable of producing a toxic metabolite and indirect chemical injury?
    • A. 

      Alcohol

    • B. 

      Aspirin

    • C. 

      Carbon monoxide

    • D. 

      Mercury poisoning

    • E. 

      Cyanide

  • 11. 
     A circumscribed mass of light yellow crumbly to pasty material associated microscopically with a macrophage response is  characteristic of
    • A. 

      Caseous necrosis

    • B. 

      Coagulative necrosis

    • C. 

      Fibrinoid necrosis

    • D. 

      Gangrenous necrosis

  • 12. 
    A well-demarcated lesion with increased cytoplasmic eosinophilia, karyolysis, and intact tissue architecture is characteristic of
    • A. 

      Caseous necrosis

    • B. 

      Enzymatic fat necrosis

    • C. 

      Coagulative necrosis

    • D. 

      Cloudy swelling

    • E. 

      Liquefactive necrosis

  • 13. 
    The pattern of cell death that is characterized by the conversion of a single cell to an acidophilic body, usually with loss of the  nucleus but with preservation of its shape to permit recognition of cell boundaries is termed 
    • A. 

      Apoptosis

    • B. 

      Caseous necrosis

    • C. 

      Fibrinoid necrosis

    • D. 

      Liquefactive necrosis

  • 14. 
    A 65-year-old man presents with angina and dyspnea. He has a family history of hypercholesterolemia. Unfortunately despite thrombolytic therapy, he dies.  What would you expect to see on light microscopic examination of cardiac tissue?
    • A. 

      Caseous necrosis

    • B. 

      Enzymatic fat necrosis

    • C. 

      Liquefactive necrosis

    • D. 

      Coagulative necrosis

  • 15. 
    Laparoscopic examination of the abdomen was performed on a 50-year-old chronic alcoholic man.  The surgeon noted the digestion of tissue with soap formation and calcification. Which of the following is this most likely characteristic of?
    • A. 

      Coagulative necrosis

    • B. 

      Caseous necrosis

    • C. 

      Enzymatic fat necrosis

    • D. 

      Liquefactive necrosi

  • 16. 
     The action of putrefactive bacteria on necrotic tissue results in
    • A. 

      Coagulation

    • B. 

      Infarction

    • C. 

      Gangrene

    • D. 

      Embolism

    • E. 

      Caseation

  • 17. 
     A well-demarcated area of myocardium appears paler than surrounding tissue and microscopically consists of eosinophilic muscle fibers with only a few karyorrhectic and pyknotic nuclei remaining. Many polys are seen, especially at the margin of this area. The age of the myocardial infarct is most likely 
    • A. 

      2 minutes

    • B. 

      2 hours

    • C. 

      2 days

    • D. 

      2 weeks

    • E. 

      2 months

  • 18. 
    You are asked to write a microscopic description of the coagulative necrosis that was noted in the heart of a patient who died of a heart attack because of cocaine abuse.  Which of the following best described coagulative necrosis?
    • A. 

      Eosinophilic cytoplasm with cell outlines preserved

    • B. 

      Granular, friable mass of material devoid of cell outlines

    • C. 

      Localized, solid, basophilic lesion with calcification

    • D. 

      Necrosis in which tissue is converted into a fluid

  • 19. 
     Caseous necrosis is characterized morphologically by 
    • A. 

      Preservation of tissue outlines

    • B. 

      Basophilia

    • C. 

      Semi-liquid consistency

    • D. 

      Wedge-shaped periphery

    • E. 

      Amorphous appearance

  • 20. 
    Caseous necrosis is characterized morphologically by 
    • A. 

      Preservation of tissue outlines

    • B. 

      Basophilia

    • C. 

      Semi-liquid consistency

    • D. 

      Wedge-shaped periphery

    • E. 

      Amorphous appearance

  • 21. 
    Which tissue is the most susceptible to liquefactive necrosis following ischemic injury?
    • A. 

      Pancreas

    • B. 

      Liver

    • C. 

      Spleen

    • D. 

      Brain

    • E. 

      Intestine

  • 22. 
    A patient suffers a stroke and has left-sided weakness and paralysis in the upper extremity. The type of necrosis associated with a well-developed infarct of the brain is
    • A. 

      Coagulative

    • B. 

      Enzymatic fat

    • C. 

      Liquefactive

    • D. 

      Gangrenous

  • 23. 
    A 75-year-old woman has a complaint of shortness of breath and chest pain that radiates to the left shoulder.  Serum levels of CK-MB (myocardial creatine kinase) and cardiac muscle troponin I (cTnI) are elevated. Which of the following types of myocardial cell death would best account for these findings?
    • A. 

      Apoptosis

    • B. 

      Caseous necrosis

    • C. 

      Coagulative necrosis

    • D. 

      Fat necrosis

    • E. 

      Liquefactive necrosis

  • 24. 
    Coagulative necrosis usually results from
    • A. 

      Abscess formation

    • B. 

      Ischemia

    • C. 

      Trauma

    • D. 

      Tuberculosis

    • E. 

      Syphilis