AP Literature Practice Test 1

31 Questions

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AP Literature Quizzes & Trivia

You may use resources with this quiz, but please do not print it off and use elimination to work up to a higher grade and do not talk to another student about the answers. Happy quizzing!


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    O wild West Wind, though breath of Autumn’s being. Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing. Yellow, and black, and pale, and hectic red, Pestilence-stricken multitudes: O thou Who chariotest to their dark wintry bed The winged seeds, where they lie cold and low, Each like a corpse within its grave, until Thine azure sister of the Spring shall blow Her clarion o’er the dreaming earth, and fill (Driving sweet buds like flocks to feed in air) With living hues and odours plain and hill: Wild Spirit, which art moving everywhere: Destroyer and preserver; hear, oh hear! -from Ode to the West Wind by Percy Bysshe Shelley Which of the following is not used by the speaker to describe the power of the wind?
    • A. 

      Apostrophe

    • B. 

      Oxymoron

    • C. 

      Paradox

    • D. 

      Simile

    • E. 

      Synecdoche

  • 2. 
    • A. 

      A charioteer

    • B. 

      A corpse

    • C. 

      A plague

    • D. 

      A sorcerer

    • E. 

      A trumpeter

  • 3. 
    Which of the following is best represented by the definition and example below? A figure of speech in which someone absent or dead or something nonhuman is addressed as if it were alive and present and was able to reply. "O wild West Wind..." is an example of this device.
    • A. 

      Alliteration

    • B. 

      Antimetabole

    • C. 

      Antistrophe

    • D. 

      Apostrophe

    • E. 

      Asyndeton

  • 4. 
    “Destroyer and preserver” is an example of the juxtaposition of two terms that appear to be contradictory. This is known as a/an...
    • A. 

      Synecdoche

    • B. 

      Simile

    • C. 

      Paradox

    • D. 

      Oxymoron

    • E. 

      None of the above

  • 5. 
    Far, far beneath in the abysmal sea, His ancient, dreamless, uninvaded sleep The Kraken sleepeth: faintest sunlights flee The Kraken sleepeth: faintest sunlights flee About his shadowy sides: above him swell -from The Kraken by Alfred, Lord Tennyson In the excerpt above, "sleep" and "sleepeth" represent a stylistic scheme in which words derived from the same root are repeated. In other words, "uninvaded sleep" refers to sleep as a noun and sleepeth is a verb. What is the name of this stylistic device?
    • A. 

      Antimetabole

    • B. 

      Exemplum

    • C. 

      Hyperbaton

    • D. 

      Polyptoton

    • E. 

      Syllogism

    • F. 

      Penguin stuffing

  • 6. 
    A literary work, especially a play, that has a happy ending -- often marked by marriage. Examples of this type of literary work include: The Taminge of the Shrew and A Midsummer Night's Dream--both by William Shakespeare.
    • A. 

      Comedy

    • B. 

      History

    • C. 

      Morality

    • D. 

      Romance

    • E. 

      Tragedy

  • 7. 
    The high point of interest or suspense in a literary work is known as the ___________.
    • A. 

      Exposition

    • B. 

      Rising action

    • C. 

      Climax

    • D. 

      Falling action

    • E. 

      Resolution

  • 8. 
    • A. 

      Caesura

    • B. 

      Conceit

    • C. 

      Dramatic monologue

    • D. 

      Hyperbole

    • E. 

      Metonymy

  • 9. 
    Unrhymed poetry written in iambic pentameter is known as __________.
    • A. 

      A ballad

    • B. 

      Blank verse

    • C. 

      Free verse

    • D. 

      Sestina

    • E. 

      Terza rima

  • 10. 
    • A. 

      A Penguin's heart song

    • B. 

      Chicken ala King

    • C. 

      Carpe diem

    • D. 

      Pastoral romance

    • E. 

      Conceit

  • 11. 
    A song that tells a story, often dealing with adventure or romance, or a poem imitating such a song. Most of these songs or poems are divided into four- or six-line stanzas, are rhymed, use simple language, and depict dramatic action.
    • A. 

      Ballad

    • B. 

      Caesura

    • C. 

      Elegy

    • D. 

      Lyric poem

    • E. 

      Sonnet

  • 12. 
    Calling a cigarette a "smoke" or a businessman a "suit" are examples of what literary device?
    • A. 

      Conceit

    • B. 

      Epiphany

    • C. 

      Imagery

    • D. 

      Kenning

    • E. 

      Metonymy

  • 13. 
    A reference, in a work of literature, to a well-known person, place, event, literary work, or work of art is known as a/an _________. In the Twilight series, Stephenie Meyer mentions Wuthering Heights and Romeo and Juliet--her usage of these well-known literary works is an example of this literary device.
    • A. 

      Allegory

    • B. 

      Allusion

    • C. 

      Anapest

    • D. 

      Antimetabole

    • E. 

      Assonance

    • F. 

      Illusion

    • G. 

      Metaphor

  • 14. 
    Deliberate exaggeration or overstament is known as _________. Examples of this device include: - I'm so tired I could sleep for a month. - I'm so hungry I could eat a horse. - I will just, like, die if my parents take away my cell phone. - I don't have time to go out this weekend. I've got a million things to do.
    • A. 

      Apostrophe

    • B. 

      Hyperbole

    • C. 

      Isocolon

    • D. 

      Onomatopoeia

    • E. 

      Paradox

  • 15. 
    Instead of having metrical feet and lines, this type of poetry has a rhythm that suits its meaning and that uses the sounds of spoken language in lines of different lengths. In other words--no rhyme, no meter = _____.
    • A. 

      Balassi stanza

    • B. 

      Blank verse

    • C. 

      Free verse

    • D. 

      Rondel verse

    • E. 

      Terza rima

  • 16. 
    A poem expressing the observations and feelings of a single speaker is known as a/an __________. Often involves distinctively strong emotions.
    • A. 

      Elegy

    • B. 

      Epic poem

    • C. 

      Kenning

    • D. 

      Lyric poem

    • E. 

      Narrative poem

  • 17. 
    A poem that tells a story in verse is known as a/an _____. Three traditional types of this poetry inlcude ballads, epics, and metrical romances. The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge is one example of this type of poem.
    • A. 

      Elegy

    • B. 

      Epic poem

    • C. 

      Kenning

    • D. 

      Metaphysical poem

    • E. 

      Narrative poem

  • 18. 
    A fourteen-line lyric poem with a single theme is known as a/an ___. This type of poem is usually written in iambic pentameter, but variances in meter do exist.
    • A. 

      Ballad

    • B. 

      Elegy

    • C. 

      Psalm

    • D. 

      Refrain

    • E. 

      Sonnet

  • 19. 
    A sonnet that is divided into two parts -- an octave and a sestet -- and usually has a rhyme scheme of abba abba cde cde is known as a/an __________ sonnet. The two parts of this sonnet work together. The octave raises a question, states a problem, or presents a brief narrative; the sestet answers the question, solves the problem or comments on the narrative.
    • A. 

      Miltonic

    • B. 

      Petrarchan

    • C. 

      Shakespearean

    • D. 

      Spenserian

    • E. 

      This does not actually explain a type of sonnet.

  • 20. 
    A sonnet comprised of three quatrains plus a concluding couplet is known as a / an _________ sonnet. The rhyme scheme is usually abab cdcd efef gg. Each of the quatrains explores a different variation of the main theme and the couplet presents a concluding statement.
    • A. 

      Shakespearean

    • B. 

      Petrarchan

    • C. 

      Spenserian

    • D. 

      Wheelerian

    • E. 

      Miltonic

  • 21. 
    A  variant on the English form is the _____ sonnet. This form has a rhyme scheme of abab bcbc cdcd ee.
    • A. 

      Miltonian

    • B. 

      Petrarchan

    • C. 

      Shakespearean

    • D. 

      Spenserian

    • E. 

      This does not actually explain a type of sonnet.

  • 22. 
    Christina Rossetti uses what literary device to describe two sisters in this excerpt from "Goblin Market"? (Pick the dominant or most obviouse device) Like two blossoms of one stem, Like two flakes of new-fallen snow, Like two wands of ivory Tipped with gold for awful kings.
    • A. 

      Metaphor

    • B. 

      Oxymoron

    • C. 

      Paradox

    • D. 

      Simile

    • E. 

      Symbolism

  • 23. 
    The imaginary voice assumed by the writer of a poem is known as the ____________.
    • A. 

      Speaker

    • B. 

      Scansion

    • C. 

      Setting

    • D. 

      Mumbo

    • E. 

      Aspect

  • 24. 
    The process of analyzing the metrical pattern of a poem is known as __________.
    • A. 

      Scansion

    • B. 

      Metering

    • C. 

      Tap dancing

    • D. 

      Stripping

    • E. 

      Viewing

  • 25. 
    The time and place of the action of a literary work is known as the _______.
    • A. 

      Setting

    • B. 

      Scene

    • C. 

      Backdrop

    • D. 

      Rhetorical situation

    • E. 

      Tone / mood

  • 26. 
    A long often elaborate speech in a play or in a prose work made by a character who is alone and thus reveals his or her private thoughts and feelings to the audience or reader is known as a/an ______.
    • A. 

      Soliloquy

    • B. 

      Heart song

    • C. 

      Ballad

    • D. 

      Epic

    • E. 

      Aside

  • 27. 
    A metaphorical phrase, used in Anglo-Saxon poetry to replace a concrete noun is known as a/an ______. Examples include: battle-sweat = blood raven-harvest = corpse bane-of-wood = fire whale-road = the sea sea-steed = a ship
    • A. 

      Epithet

    • B. 

      Isocolon

    • C. 

      Kenning

    • D. 

      Paradox

    • E. 

      Spondee

  • 28. 
    The following example--from Robert Frost's "To Earthward" is an example of what type of imagery? "musk from hidden grapevine springs"
    • A. 

      Auditory

    • B. 

      Gustatory

    • C. 

      Olfactory

    • D. 

      Tactile

    • E. 

      Visual

  • 29. 
    The quality of literary works that deal with the pleasures of a simple, rural life or with escape to a simpler place and time is known as _______. Christopher Marlowe's "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love" (p. 217 in your textbook) is an example of this.
    • A. 

      Pastoral

    • B. 

      Carpe diem

    • C. 

      Ballad

    • D. 

      Epic

  • 30. 
    A type of drama or literature that shows the downfall or destruction of a noble or outstanding character/person--traditionally one who possesses a character weakness or tragic flaw. Hamlet by Shakespeare and Antigone by Sophocles are examples of this type of drama.
    • A. 

      Agonies

    • B. 

      Tragedies

    • C. 

      Histories

    • D. 

      Realities

    • E. 

      Fantasies

  • 31. 
    The statment the first shall be last and the last shall be first is an example of...
    • A. 

      Oxymoron

    • B. 

      Paradox

    • C. 

      Antagonism

    • D. 

      Metaphor

    • E. 

      Orwellian double speak