8th Grade Interim Assessment #1 Intervention - 8.2.6

6 Questions | Total Attempts: 1121

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8th Grade Quizzes & Trivia

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    Bill of Rights      Several states ratified the Constitution only after they were promised that a bill protecting individual rights would be added to it. Many Antifederalists did not think that the Constitution would protect personal freedoms.      James Madison wanted to make a bill of rights, one of the new government’s first priorities. In Congress’s first session, Madison encouraged the legislators to put together a bill of rights.   The rights would then be added to the Constitution as amendments, or official changes.  By December 1791 the states had ratified the Bill of Rights—10 of the proposed amendments intended to protect citizens’ rights.      The first ten amendments are as follows: 1st - freedom of speech, religion, press, petition, and assembly, 2nd - right to bear arms, 3rd - do not have to house soldiers in a time of peace, 4th - no unreasonable searches and seizures without a warrant, 5th - no double jeopardy, due process, 6th - speedy, public trial, right to a lawyer, 7th - jury trial for civil cases, 8th - no cruel and unusual punishments, no excessive bail, 9th - Bill of Rights does not list all the citizens rights, 10th - powers not delgated to the national government are reserved to the States. Increased flexibility for changes       The Federal System The framers of the Constitution wanted to create a government powerful enough to protect the rights of citizens and defend the country against its enemies. To do so, they set up a federal system of government, a system that divided powers between the states and the federal government.      The Constitution assigns certain powers to the national government. These are called delegated powers. Among them are the rights to coin money and to regulate trade. Reserved powers are those kept by the states. These powers include creating local governments and holding elections. Concurrent powers are those shared by the federal and state governments. They include taxing, borrowing money, and enforcing laws.       Sometimes, Congress has had to stretch its delegated powers to deal with new or unexpected issues. A clause in the Constitution states that Congress may “make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper” for carrying out its duties. This clause, called the elastic clause—because it can be stretched (like elastic)—provides flexibility for the government.
  • 2. 
    1. The Bill of Rights is best defined by
    • A. 

      A. liberties given to a monarch/leader

    • B. 

      B. liberties given to Congress

    • C. 

      C. liberties given to citizens

    • D. 

      D. liberties given to the church

  • 3. 
    2. Which statement, within the Constitution, gives our national government the ability to make laws as needed?
    • A. 

      1. reserved powers

    • B. 

      2. concurrent powers

    • C. 

      3. federalism

    • D. 

      D. elastic clause

  • 4. 
    3. Which amendment gives citizens rights of "due process"?
    • A. 

      A. First Amendment

    • B. 

      B. Third Amendment

    • C. 

      C. Fifth Amendment

    • D. 

      D. Seventh Amendment

  • 5. 
    4. Which amendment givens citizens the right to petition the government?
    • A. 

      A. First Amendment

    • B. 

      B. Second Amendment

    • C. 

      C. Third Amendment

    • D. 

      D. Fourth Amendment

  • 6. 
    5. Which amendment gives the individual States the right to grant liberties, not stated in the U.S. Constitution?
    • A. 

      A. Tenth Amendment

    • B. 

      B. Ninth Amendment

    • C. 

      C. Eighth Amendment

    • D. 

      D. Seventh Amendment

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