5-4. Ideal Gas Law

10 Questions | Total Attempts: 586

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5-4. Ideal Gas Law

Questions on the ideal gas law. Note that R = 0. 08206 L atm/mol K


Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    A sample of gas occupies 2.5 liters of space. How many moles of gas are there if its pressure is 1.2 atm and temperature is 25C? ___ mol (round to the nearest hundreth).
  • 2. 
    What volume of space would 1 mole of gas occupy if it is at a temperature of 0C and pressure of 1 atm? ____ liters (round to the nearest tenth)
  • 3. 
    At what pressure is a 5 liter container containing 20g of oxygen gas at a temperature of 10C? ____ atm (round to the nearest tenth)
  • 4. 
    What is the temperature is a 500 mL container of 100g of hydrogen gas () held at a pressure of 0.25 atm? ____K (round to two decimal places)
  • 5. 
    A container of nitrogen gas () contains 40 g of nitrogen gas, is at a pressure of 4 atm, and has a temperature of 50C. Given this information, the volume must be _____ liters. (round to two decimal places)
  • 6. 
    How many grams of helium gas is in a container with pressure 3.7atm, a volume of 440 mL, and a temperature of 500K? ___g: round to two decimal places.
  • 7. 
    How many grams of carbon dioxide gas () are in a 50 liter sample at a pressure of 1 atm and temperature of 100C? ___ g (round to one decimal place)
  • 8. 
    What volume is occupied by 32g of oxygen gas () at 40C and 1atm? ___ liters (round to one decimal place)
  • 9. 
    Can the following conditions exist: A container with 3 moles of gas at a pressure of 6.1 atm, volume of 40.25 liters, and temperature of 290K?
    • A. 

      Yes, this container follows the ideal gas law.

    • B. 

      No, this container does not follow the ideal gas law.

  • 10. 
    Can the following exist: A 20 liter container with 128g of oxygen gas () at a pressure of 5atm and temperature of 304.65K?
    • A. 

      Yes, this container follows the ideal gas law.

    • B. 

      No, there is a violation of the ideal gas law.

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