What is the difference between auxochrome and chromophore? - ProProfs Discuss
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What is the difference between auxochrome and chromophore?

Asked by R. Barnes, Last updated: Nov 08, 2019

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D. Peter

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D. PeterSoftware Developer, B.E (Bachelor of Engineering), Mexico
Software Developer, B.E (Bachelor of Engineering), Mexico

Answered on Nov 08, 2019

A chromophore is the portion of the molecule that usually becomes exposed to the visible light. It usually absorbs the light and showoff a certain color that may be different from the color of the light that it has absorbed. The auxochrome is known to be a group of atoms that will have the tendency to improve the capability of the chromophore.

There are times when auxochromes are deliberately attached to the chromophores to make the type of light that will be reflected deeper and richer than usual. These two portions are normally used to create different types of dyes in varying colors.

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J. Rogers

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J. RogersRosshazlewood, MA, Birmingham
Rosshazlewood, MA, Birmingham

Answered on Nov 01, 2019

An auxochrome is an assembly of atoms that will convey a specific color when connected to a chromosphere; however, when present alone, it will fail to produce the color. The chromosphere is the part of the molecule that, when exposed to visible light, absorbs and indicates a specific color. An auxochrome is a collection of atoms that is serviceable and possesses the ability to reflect colors.

Auxochrome adds the color of any organic element. Auxochromes are typically called “color helpers.” Chromophores also change the energy in the system. It gives the dyeing property of absorbing radiations, whereas auxochrome imparts it with the appearance of being colored. They are represented as nitrogen, carbon, oxygen, and sulfur, which generally have single or double bonds. Also, chromophores with double covalent bonds seem to be colored due to the heightened state of electrons.

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