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What has been the biggest contribution of your country to the field of computer science?

Asked by Victor Roy, Last updated: Feb 21, 2020

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5 Answers

K. Galatia

K. Galatia

Answered Oct 15, 2019

The US has contributed significantly to the medical profession through computer science. The analyzing of medical data to promote the creation of more effective treatments and procedures such as digital imaging breast biopsy and designing artificial limbs. It has also facilitated the tracking of the impact of upcoming severe weather, which involves computer science.

Computer science has created a plethora of new jobs in the United States. These skills are in great demand, and the US has fewer workers than are necessary. Labor statistics show that half of the jobs by the year 2020 will be in computing. Also, all medical fields will need to have people with proficient computational skills. There is an effort in the making to ensure that computer science becomes available in schools.

 

K. Galatia

K. Galatia

Answered Oct 15, 2019

Charles Babbage was a mathematician, philosopher, and an engineer. He invented the concept of digital programmable computers. He created the first computer, which he called "the difference engine." It was produced in 1822, and it was the size of a house, although it could only hold one program. It was powered by steam, and it could even print, and he worked on it for ten years.

He began to make the first general-purpose computer called "the analytical engine." They couldn't build the machines because they didn't have the funding, which made people believe Babbage was crazy, and he lost his credibility. It was an issue of having the right idea at the wrong time. When they were finally able to build it, they discovered it worked remarkably well.

 

L. Hawkes

L. Hawkes, Teacher, Memphis

Answered Dec 05, 2018

The theory of fractals is the most significant contribution of Benoit Mandelbrot to computer science and science in general. Benoit Mandelbrot was a Polish-born, French American mathematician and polymath with broad interests in the practical sciences; especially regarding what he described as “the art of roughness” of physical phenomena and the uncontrolled element in life.

He referred to himself as a fractional, and he is recognized for his contribution to the field of fractional geometry. During his career, he received over fifteen honorary doctorates, and he served on many science journals, along with many awards.

 

Dylan Baptist

Dylan Baptist

Answered Mar 03, 2018

Australia invented Wifi, and without it, the basis of modern computer, mobile and other technological devices would be non-existant.

 

R.Roanre

R.Roanre

Answered Feb 08, 2018

During the Industrial revolution, the United States has contributed to the field of computer science by first inventing tools and equipment like the weaver and mechanical reapers. These inventions began the increase in technology at an early stage of history. Later, other inventors like Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson created mechanical devices that were involved in the field of computer science. Some contributions to science came by way of those who emigrated to the United States or presented information to the United States like Albert Einstein.

During the Industrial revolution, the United States has contributed to the field of computer

It is difficult to decide one person who contributed to the field of computer science, but Alexander Graham Bell has contributed the most to science and technology due to his invention of the telephone which allowed people to communicate over wires.

 

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