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Tooth sensitivity has become a common problem nowadays and there are about 40 million adults in the United States who suffer from this problem. Yes, you read it right! I mean 40 million is such a huge number and we can’t ignore this fact. There is no fixed age group for this problem as it can happen to anyone.

Basically, tooth sensitivity involves sudden ache or pain in teeth whenever we eat something hot or cold. In some people, this pain is very sharp and their teeth get hurt badly. However, it’s a temporary problem which gets fixed after some time. There are some things like hot and sour foods, chilled water, or something with high and low temperature which can increase sensitivity in our teeth. Fortunately, the treatment of sensitive teeth is possible and you can find an easy solution to this problem.

Enamel is a hard layer and acts as a protective agent for the underlying layer of dentin in our teeth. And dentin is softer than enamel. Tooth roots of human beings are protected by gums if both are gone or torn away, they cause sensitivity.

Tooth sensitivity can be caused by various factors which are given below:

  • Brushing too hard

  • Tooth grinding

  • Gum diseases

  • Longer use of mouthwash

  • Dental procedures

  • Over Consumption of acidic food and drink

  • Abrasive toothpaste

If you are facing teeth sensitivity, you should immediately contact your doctor.

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Most people assume the only reason that you need braces is that you want your teeth to be straight. Braces can also correct cosmetic issues and improve a wide number of health issues in both the dental and physical category. Braces can straighten crooked teeth, which is their primary function. Straighter teeth are easier to clean. Braces can also align teeth.

If your teeth are even somewhat out of alignment, you might find yourself clenching or grinding your teeth, especially as you sleep. Properly aligned teeth can lead to fewer jaw aches. Braces correct a misaligned bite. An overbite occurs when the upper jaw comes out in front of the lower jaw when you bite down. Underbite occurs when your lower jaw overlaps your upper jaw.

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Around the very outside of your teeth is enamel. Enamel is the most robust material in the entire body. Enamel is mostly fabricated of calcium phosphate, which is a tough mineral. Beneath the enamel is a part of the tooth called dentin, which is the layer comprised of the majority of your tooth structure.

No bones about it, teeth are of many tissues of varying density and hardness. The cellular tissues that eventually become teeth generate from the embryonic germ layer, known as the ectoderm. The general structure of your teeth is similar across the vertebrates, although there is considerable variation in their form and position.

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Use a soft-bristled toothbrush on natural teeth and gauze or a soft toothbrush to clean your tongue, cheeks, and roof of your mouth. Brush your dentures at least daily. To brush teeth, hold the toothbrush parallel to the teeth, and position the bristles in the area of the tissue, so they are placed just below the gumline. Apply slight pressure with the brush, so the bristles are slightly bent.

Gently move the brush in a circular motion for approximately twenty brush strokes. When the brush strokes are complete, roll the bristles away from the gum tissue in a sweeping motion. Continue these steps until all of the front surfaces of the top and bottom teeth have been cleaned. Then, gently brush your tongue, and the inside of your cheeks Brush twice a day and replace toothbrush every three months.

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Human teeth and animal teeth are not delicate. A genetic predisposition of soft enamel may run in your family. Also, genetic disorders can affect the dentin, which is the layer beneath your enamel. These states can lead to compromised teeth that crack and break.

Advanced periodontal conditions can also cause brittle teeth. If left untreated, gingivitis, an inflammation of the gums, can lead to more severe inflammation around the teeth and weakening of the bone. Certain personal habits also contribute to the weakening of the teeth. Brushing your teeth too often or too forcefully can strip your enamel, making your teeth more vulnerable to decay and breakage.

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Hyperdontia is the condition of having extra teeth or teeth that appear in addition to the normal number of teeth. They can show in any area of the dental arch and can affect any dental organ. The technical definition of hyperdontia is any tooth or structure that is made from tooth germ in a surplus of usual number for any given region of the dental arch.

They can be any number of teeth and can occur at any place in the dental arch. They may be symmetrical or nonsymmetrical. There is evidence of hereditary factors and environmental factors leading to this condition. Hypodontia is seen in many disorders, including Gardner's syndrome, and cleidocranial dysostosis.

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Root canals are usually performed with the aid of a local anesthetic which is a pain-blocking medication that numbs a specific area of the body. Sodium hypochlorite is a significant component of the chemical preparation. The dentist places a rubber sheet around the tooth to ensure it is dry during treatment.

The dam prevents you from swallowing or breathing in any chemicals the dentist uses. After the pulp in the tooth is removed, your dentist will clean and enlarge the root canal, so it can be quickly filled.

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Harmful oral bacteria feed on the sugar you eat to form acids that erode tooth enamel. Enamel is the shiny, hard, protective outer coating of the tooth. Cavities are a bacterial infection that is created by acids that cause your teeth to have a hole in them. Cavities can drill past the enamel and into the deeper layers of the tooth, causing pain and tooth loss.

Lactic acid, which is made when bacteria in the plaque eats the sugar can harm teeth. Lactic acid lowers the pH level in the oral cavity and dissolves minerals from the enamel. The coating can then no longer fulfill its function as a protective jacket. The less sugar you consume, the lower the lactic acid production and there is less of a chance of tooth decay, resulting in an overall healthier oral cavity.

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Plaque is a yellow layer or bacteria that forms in teeth naturally while tartar is a dental calculus. Tarter is a complication of plaque. These two situations could be considered two stages of the same pathological process. However, there are a few fundamental differences between tarter and plaque. Dentists consider plaque formation as a defense mechanism to prevent colonization of disease-causing bacteria.

Biofilm, also known as dental plaque is soft enough to come off easily at first. Tarter is hard, the yellow layer which forms around the base of your teeth if plaque is allowed to develop freely and not appropriately removed. Dental plaque is soft, while tartar is hard. Plaque can be removed while brushing while tarter cannot.

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Wisdom teeth are the final teeth to come in, usually erupting between 17 and 25 years of age. Wisdom teeth have ancient roots, and the most widely accepted theory behind wisdom teeth shows us that the diet of our distant ancestors has some answers. Early humans ate a much different menu than the soft foods we eat today. Our ancestors ate a diet consisting of roots, raw meat, and tough plants.

To accommodate them chewing food, they developed a third set of molars and more massive jaws to accommodate extra teeth. Today humans have smaller jaws and eat softer foods. However, our genes still produce wisdom teeth that no longer have room to grow.

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