Topics-
Products +
     

Medication Questions and Answers (Q&A)

A.Interview the patient and/or caregiver
B. List all the medications the patient is taking at home from their original containers and how they are actually taken
C. Review at least one other reliable source of information (ex. community pharmacy, MOHLTC database, previous health record in Sunnycare)
D. Consult a Pharmacist

Continue Reading

1 Answer

Prostatitis is the infection or problem with the prostate gland. This gland is located only in men and it is found beneath the bladder. The prostate makes the sperm. After getting Prostatitis, you would feel poorly and your symptoms would feel similar to the flu because you would have the chills, a fever, aching muscle, pains in the joints and trouble using the bathroom.

If a nurse has a patient who has Prostatitis, then the nurse may give the patient a double strength dose of co-trimoxazole. If this happens, then the nurse must recommend or even make the patient drink six to eight glasses of water every day even though most people drink that much anyway while taking this medication due to the potency of this medication.

Continue Reading

1 Answer

There are times when patients need a blood transfusion. This is because they have lost too much blood for one reason or another. Ways of losing blood could be because they were involved in a car accident and they got a large cut or gash where blood is oozing out.

Plus, they may have internal bleeding as well. It is important to control the bleeding and get the person to the hospital as soon as possible. If people are shot multiple times or stabbed multiple times might need a blood transfusion.

However, there are side effects to a blood transfusion. Just because someone got the needed blood, that doesn’t mean they are out of the woods. A nurse would need to help a patient first if this patient is itching, swelling or has dyspnea.

Continue Reading

1 Answer

There are so many different drugs that nurses can administer to their patients. However, there are also a lot of different ways that medications should be given depending on the patient, their background, the drug and the situation or diagnosis the patient has been given. There are also different nursing interventions and the right one must take place or the effects could be harmful to the patient.

One type of capsule that can be given is one in which the medication slowly releases over time. This is helpful to people who need the medication distributed to them every so often without having to take medication all the time. This is called sustained-release drugs or time-released drugs. If this happens, the capsule should be taken with a lot of water.

Continue Reading

1 Answer

If someone has cancer, they may be prescribed to take cytotoxic drugs because the chemicals in these drugs cause cancer cells to stop growing. In turn, this would cause the cancer to stop growing which is what is needed to happen. However, a nurse or doctor must administer this drug to a cancer patient, but handling the drugs can also cause problems.

Any time a nurse is preparing the drug, administering it, handling the waste of a patient who takes the drug, transports the waste or cleans up after the patient who takes these cytotoxic drugs may be at risk. Any staff member who does any of these things with a patient taking the cytotoxic drugs must take precautions including wearing gloves at all times during the administration and help with a patient.

Continue Reading

1 Answer

Dextrose is the reduction of sugars in a substance that is sugary. Another name for dextrose is glucose. This dextrose is considered to be a simple sugar. The most common dextrose is the monosaccharide. Often times a nurse will use an IV to have it drop the medicine at certain times so that the patient is getting their medicine in intervals.

The nurse will set the amount of times each drop should take place. It is measured in drops per minute. In this case, a physician orders dextrose five percent in water, one thousand milliliters to be infused over eight hours. The IV tubing delivers fifteen drops per milliliters. The nurse should run the IV infusion at a rate of thirty-two drops per minute.

Continue Reading

1 Answer

When a nurse is preparing a continuous insulin infusion for a child with diabetic ketoacidosis and a blood glucose level of 800 mg/dl, the most appropriate solution at the beginning of therapy is 100 units of regular insulin in normal saline solution which is choice A. Insulin administered on its own can be very strong, especially for a child.

You would have to give insulin in small doses very often in order to bring his levels back to normal. So instead, you put the insulin in normal saline solution which allows for a steady and constant dose of insulin in order to control the child's blood glucose level and improve his diabetic ketoacidosis.

Continue Reading

1 Answer

This is actually a question which can be answered using some math. In the situation where a physician orders the following preoperative medications to be administered to a patient: meperidine (Demerol), 50 mg; hydroxyzine pamoate (Vistaril), 25 mg; and glycopyrrolate (Robinul), 0.3 mg. and the medications are dispensed as follows: meperidine, 100 mg/ml; hydroxyzine pamoate, 100 mg/2 ml; and glycopyrrolate, 0.2 mg/ml, the nurse should administer 2.5 mls total which is answer choice C. First you must convert the amounts from mgs into mls and then add the values together which equals 2.5 mls.

Continue Reading

1 Answer

There are certain procedures that need to be done before a surgical procedure is even started. A lot of these procedures include filling out paperwork so that the hospital is covered in case of an issue that takes place during the surgery. All paperwork must be completed during the admittance phase.

Sometimes, the nurses will make sure that the paperwork is complete before giving the surgeon the green light to go ahead with the procedure. If a client is scheduled for surgery at 8 a.m. and while looking at the preoperative checklist, the nurse sees that the surgical consent form isn’t signed, she will stop what she is doing. Even if it is time to administer the preoperative analgesic, she will have to let the surgeon know that the consent form isn’t signed.

Continue Reading

1 Answer

The answer to this question is choice A- staying with the client for 15 minutes after starting the infusion. When planning a patient’s care who has just been infused with whole blood, the nurse should always stay with the patient for 15 minutes because patients can have reactions to the blood they are receiving and those reactions usually happen during those first 15 minutes.

These reactions can be very severe and even life threatening so it is always good to have a medical professional there to help or to alert a doctor of the reaction.

Continue Reading

1 Answer

Loading, please wait...

Email Sent
We have sent an email to your address "" with instructions to reset your password.