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Liver Questions and Answers (Q&A)

The ligamentum venosum are fibrous remnants that travel between the porta hepatis, the liver, and the inferior vena cava. These remnants are usually obliterated when a person reaches adulthood.
The caudet lobe or lobule of spiegel is an independent part of our liver, which is supplied by the left and right hepatic artery and the portal vein. The blood that comes from this lobe is directly drained to the vena cava.

The lobe of the liver is divided into the left and the right lobe. The left lobe is more flat and smaller than the right lobe and is located in the left hypochondriac and epigastric region. The right lobe is six times larger than the left lobe and is located in the right hypochondrium.

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It is a fact that the liver is damaged by long-term abuse of alcohol; that is, not the alcohol itself when a small amount is drunk, but the excess of regular absorption of multiple drinks a day. This excess of alcohol causes scarring of the liver, and a condition called cirrhosis, where scar tissue replaces healthy liver tissue.

The reason excess alcohol causes this condition is that it overworks the liver to breakdown these toxins from the alcohol. Stopping drinking does allow some repair of the liver, but if it has occurred over too long a period it gives the liver too difficult a task and the toxins are not sufficiently excreted. Many alcoholics die from cirrhosis of the liver.

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Early signs of liver cancer are likely to centre around digestive problems such as feelings of nausea, going off your food, indigestion and/or vomiting. A loss of weight without any attempt to reduce food intake is a telling sign. Fatigue may accompany other symptoms.

There could be other reasons fo such symptoms but if there is abdominal swelling,
yellow discoloration of your skin and yellow tinges to the whites of your eyes, this is jaundice. Passing white, chalky stools is another sign.

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Keeping your liver healthy is not really different from keeping yourself healthy altogether. managing weight, engaging in exercise, including enough vegetable and fruit, all these are important. Vegetables are particularly important for liver function.

There are also cleansing agents such as grapefruit and green tea. You probably know that excess alcohol damages the liver, so this is something you can avoid. A lifestyle with heavy and prolonged alcohol abuse will lead to cirrhosis of the liver. Remember, you only have one liver and you can't live without it!

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Clearly, an operation where your liver is removed and replaced by a healthy liver, is major surgery and a very serious situation. However, if there are no additional complications, around 75% of people survive the operation and live for another five years or so. Sometimes the transplanted liver can fail, or the original disease may return.

On the other hand, a significant proportion of people live for another 10-20 years. Survival rates after liver transplant. Your chances of a successful liver transplant and long-term survival depend on the particular situation.

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I think it may not be too long before artificial livers are available to surgeons. There has been great difficulty in hepatic disease. There have been several approaches to the problem, mostly bio-engineering or cell implantation After all, a patient cannot live without a liver while awairing research and experimentation.

In Cincinatti, some scientists working on the development of artificial human livers have had some success by bioengineering human liver tissues. Stem cells, are one of the most important components of regenerative medicine. If these can be developed, the shortage of transplantable livers will not be so crucial. For stem cell transplation decreases the need for whole-organ transplantation.

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There is a rare genetic disease that is inheritable, that causes liver cancer but it is very rare. Far more commonly, cirrhosis of the liver, scarring of the tissues, that is, is caused by alcohol excess and allows primary liver cancer to develop. Death can occurr in even quite young people who are alcoholics as the excess alcohol abuses the digestive function of the liver.

Another common cause of liver cancer is the presence of the infections Hepatitis B or C. This infection derives directly from engaging in unprotected sex. Sadly, the results are similar as far as cancerous growth is concerned to the liver.

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Fruit and vegetables - more than five portions a day - is a safe bet. More specifically, leafy green vegetables, beetroot and carrot hold healthful vitamins. Grapefruit, garlic and green tea all help to cleanse the liver.

The liver becomes overworked and overloaded when we eat too many processed foods. When the liver is taxed, it can't process toxins and fat efficiently. The above list includes foods that can help cleanse the liver naturally by stimulating its natural ability to expel toxic waste from the body.

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Because it is! The liver is the largest gland, and the largest organ of the human body. How can I answer this question, WHY is it called that? Its size and its size relative to other organs is a fact. The question WHY is it called that is like asking why is this man called 'tall' when the person referred to is six foot four. The normal weight of a liver is getting on for 2 kgs in a man.

That's some size! A gland is any group of cells that manufactures and releases substances for use somewhere else in the body. The liver is the largest gland. It makes and secretes substances. As an organ, the largest organ, it actually has hundreds of different functions, so its importance is not only its size but its many vital functions.

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The liver is responsible for breaking down the blood into haem and globin. Red blood cells last about 120 days. When they expire the haemoglobin is broken down in this way. The haem of heme first breaks apart into biliverdin, a green pigment/ This rapidly reduces to bilirubin, which becomes an orangey-yellow pigment known as 'free' bilirubin, a fat-soluble form that is carried to the liver.

The liver receives two different blood vessels- the hepatic artery and the hepatic portal vein. The hepatic artery brings the oxygen from the aorta. The hepatic portal vein brings blood rich in absorbed nutrients. This portal leads from the small intestine.

Blood coming from the small intestine is de-oxygentated. It transverses at a much lower pressure than in the hepatic artery. The hepatic vein carries blood away from the liver into the vena cava, which in turn, carries the blood back to the heart. Blood from the intestines and heart mix together in the liver tissues before flowing back to the heart through the hepatic vein

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