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Food Poisoning Questions and Answers (Q&A)

No. Vertigo and food poisoning have similar symptoms. Vertigo is an ear defect that is caused when the vagus nerve suffers from an injury or defect. In Vertigo, the major symptom is seeing objects move when they really aren't moving. Food poisoning, on the other hand, causes dizziness which might be similar but it is a side symptom of food poisoning. The major problems that food poisoning causes include nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting. Food poisoning may or may not cause dizziness but vertigo definitely causes dizziness.

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Food poising is a illness caused by bacteria or other toxins in food, typically with vomiting and diarrhoea.

ood poisoning, also called foodborne illness, is illness caused by eating contaminated food. Infectious organisms — including bacteria, viruses and parasites — or their toxins are the most common causes of food poisoning.

Infectious organisms or their toxins can contaminate food at any point of processing or production. Contamination can also occur at home if food is incorrectly handled or cooked.

Food poisoning symptoms, which can start within hours of eating contaminated food, often include nausea, vomiting or diarrhea. Most often, food poisoning is mild and resolves without treatment. But some people need to go to the hospital.

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More serious food poisoning cases can cause hallucinations. This is one of the more serious symptoms, and if one is experiencing hallucinations, contact the doctor as soon as possible. If you cannot see the doctor, go to the emergency room. Hallucinations, in general, are caused by mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, but in the rare cases that it’s not from one of the usual culprits, something’s seriously wrong.


Typical food poisoning symptoms are diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and cramps. These usually follow the culprits of all food poisonings, and are fairly universal. They’re not usually serious enough to cause a trip to the emergency room. A fever of more than 100.4 degrees or so can be cause for alarm, and sometimes overheating can add to the probability of having hallucinations.

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Food poisoning can cause chest pains. However, it’s more in the lower chest - by the abdomen and in that area - instead of higher chest, by the heart. This is because food poisoning from most strains of bacteria will give you diarrhea. So, the pain will let up for a while after you go poop and get rid of some of that pressure, but it’ll build up again and result in a cycle. High chest pains - by the heart and the rib cage - can be caused by other medical conditions.


Food poisoning itself is usually inert and doesn’t require medical assistance. However, there are circumstances that could cause you to need medical attention. This is usually when you have bloody stool that persists or even a fever that doesn’t want to break.

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Scombroid food poisoning can cause hives. This kind of food poisoning comes from fish that have spoiled. Hives are one of the first symptoms that could appear, in addition to all of the usual food poisoning symptoms - such as vomiting, diarrhea, and cramping in the abdominal area. Scombroid, however, tends to appear more like an allergic reaction to fish. Take heart, lovers of fish. It doesn’t mean you’re allergic to fish. It just means you got a bad fish.


If you’re worried about your health after eating a fish, a trip to the doctor wouldn’t hurt anything. If it’s nothing more than mild food poisoning, the doctor can give you a few tips on how to rough it out. However, if you’re in serious danger of having other symptoms or have had more serious symptoms, going to the doctor could save your life.

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Once the germs that cause food poisoning get into our systems, some of them release toxins. These toxins are poisons (the reason for the name "food poisoning"), and they can give a person diarrhea and vomiting. Most of the time, doctors use "food poisoning" to describe an illness that comes on quickly after eating contaminated food. People often get diarrhea or start throwing up within a few hours after being infected.

The good news is, food poisoning usually goes away quickly too. Most people recover in a couple of days with no lasting complications. When people need medical treatment for food poisoning, it's often because of dehydration.

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Bacteria and viruses are the most common cause of food poisoning. The symptoms and severity of food poisoning vary, depending on which bacteria or virus has contaminated the food. The bacteria and viruses that cause the most illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths in the United States are: Salmonella, Norovirus (Norwalk Virus), Campylobacter, E. coli, Listeria, and Clostridium perfringens.

The symptoms and severity of food poisoning vary, depending on which bacteria or virus has contaminated the food. Parasites are organisms that derive nourishment and protection from other living organisms known as hosts. Many bacterial, viral or parasitic agents cause food poisoning.

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During pregnancy, food poisoning can cause even more anxiety. In addition to feeling ill, you’re worried about the safety of your baby-to-be. Food safety is an important issue for pregnant women, for good reason. If you get food poisoning while pregnant, it can be dangerous. In the worst cases, it can cause miscarriage, stillbirth, or premature delivery.

If you get food poisoning during pregnancy, it’s important to let your doctor know right away. Unfortunately, pregnant women are more susceptible to food poisoning because of changes to their metabolism and circulation. Let your doctor know if you become dehydrated. Severe dehydration during pregnancy might require hospitalization and/or an IV to issue fluids.

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Let your stomach settle. After you experience the most explosive symptoms of food poisoning, like vomiting, diarrhea, and upset stomach, experts recommend letting your stomach settle. That means avoiding food and drink altogether for a few hours. Liquid intake is crucial for helping your body fight off food poisoning.

Vomiting and diarrhea can cause dehydration, so sucking on ice chips or taking small sips of water is a good starting point. Sports drinks that contain electrolytes are the best way to prevent dehydration during this time. When you feel you might be able to hold down food, eat foods that are gentle on your stomach and gastrointestinal tract. Stick to bland, low-fat, low-fiber foods.

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“Food poisoning” is a broad term that can actually cover a whole lot of different infections. Your exact symptoms and their severity will vary. That will depend on the kind of bacteria, virus, or parasite that’s infected you, how much is in your system, and how well your immune system is fighting it off.

Despite the wide range of types, most cases of food poisoning cause some mix of the following: Diarrhea, Nausea, or Vomiting. If you have a mild case, you might think you have a stomach flu or virus. You may get better without any treatment. But some people have such bad symptoms that they may need to go to the hospital.

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