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Safe Serve Practice Questions Ch 1- 3

59 Questions
Safe Serve Practice Questions Ch 1- 3

This is for work. This test is going to help you pass.

Questions and Answers
  • 1. 
    • A. 

      Time temp abuse

    • B. 

      Poor personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Cross contamination

  • 2. 
    • A. 

      Time temp abuse

    • B. 

      Poor personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Cross contamination

  • 3. 
    • A. 

      Time temp abuse

    • B. 

      Poor personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Cross contamination

  • 4. 
    • A. 

      Time temp abuse

    • B. 

      Poor personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Cross contamination

  • 5. 
    A food handler leaves the restroom without washing her hands
    • A. 

      Time temp abuse

    • B. 

      Poor personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Cross contamination

  • 6. 
    • A. 

      Time temp abuse

    • B. 

      Poor personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Cross contamination

  • 7. 
    Why are elderly people at a higher risk for food borne illnesses?
    • A. 

      Their immune systems have weakened with age

    • B. 

      They are more likely to spend time in a hospital

    • C. 

      Climb a tree

  • 8. 
    The three categories of food safety hazards are biological, physical, and
    • A. 

      Temporal

    • B. 

      Chemical

    • C. 

      Biological

  • 9. 
    For a food borne illness to be considered an "outbreak," a minimum of how many people must experience the same illness after eating the same food?
    • A. 

      1

    • B. 

      2

    • C. 

      20

  • 10. 
    The three keys to food safety are practicing good personal hygiene, preventing cross contamination, and
    • A. 

      Toxic metal leaching

    • B. 

      Time temperature control

    • C. 

      Thawing it out

  • 11. 
    According to the CDC, the five common causes for food borne illnesses are failing to cook food adequately, holding food at incorrect temperatures, using contaminated equipment, practicing poor personal hygiene, and
    • A. 

      Reheating leftover food

    • B. 

      Purchasing food from unsafe sources

    • C. 

      Cool it down

  • 12. 
    FATTOM stands for
    • A. 

      Food, Acidity, Temperature, Time, Oxygen, Moisture

    • B. 

      Food, Action, Temperature, Temporal, Oxygen, Mixture

    • C. 

      Food, Acidity, Temperature, Twitch, Orange, Moisture

  • 13. 
    • A. 

      35* F- 145*F

    • B. 

      41*F- 135*F

    • C. 

      41*F- 145*F

  • 14. 
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 15. 
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 16. 
    Listeriosis
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 17. 
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 18. 
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 19. 
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 20. 
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 21. 
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 22. 
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 23. 
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 24. 
    Shigellosis
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 25. 
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 26. 
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 27. 
    Clostridium perfringens gastroenteritis
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 28. 
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 29. 
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 30. 
    Crytosporidiosis
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 31. 
    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP)
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 32. 
    Ciguatera fish poisoning
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 33. 
    Vibrio gastroenteritis
    • A. 

      Purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers

    • B. 

      Practicing personal hygiene

    • C. 

      Controlling time and temperature

    • D. 

      Preventing cross contamination

  • 34. 
    • A. 

      Between 1*F to 40*F

    • B. 

      Between 41*F to 135*F

  • 35. 
    • A. 

      Giardia duodenalis

    • B. 

      Salmonella spp

    • C. 

      Shiga toxin- producing E. Coli

  • 36. 
    Which practice can reduce Salmonella spp. in poultry to safe levels?
    • A. 

      Storing food at 55*F or higher

    • B. 

      Inspecting canned food for damage

    • C. 

      Cooking food to the right temperature

  • 37. 
    • A. 

      Staphylococcus aureus

    • B. 

      Norovirus

    • C. 

      Vibrio vulnificus

  • 38. 
    Which food borne illness has been linked with ready to eat food and shellfish contaminated by sewage?
    • A. 

      Hepatitis A

    • B. 

      Anisakiasis

    • C. 

      Shigellosis

  • 39. 
    Viruses such as Norovirus and hepatitis A can be spread when food handlers fail to
    • A. 

      Use pasteurized eggs

    • B. 

      Wash their hands

    • C. 

      Determine the correct moisture level

  • 40. 
    What is the best way to prevent a food borne illness caused by seafood toxins?
    • A. 

      Freezing seafood prior to cooking it

    • B. 

      Purchasing smoked or cured seafood

    • C. 

      Purchasing seafood from approved, reputable suppliers

  • 41. 
    A person who ate raw oysters later became disoriented and suffered memory loss. What illness was most likely the cause?
    • A. 

      Amnesic shellfish poisoning

    • B. 

      Paralytic shellfish poisoning

    • C. 

      Neurotoxic shellfish poisoning

  • 42. 
    Food service operations should not use mushrooms unless they have been
    • A. 

      Stored at 41*F or lower

    • B. 

      Frozen before cooking or serving

    • C. 

      Purchased from an approved, reputable supplier

  • 43. 
    Jack needed to prep heads of lettuce. When he ripped open the box, two staples flew off. he couple only find one of them, which he threw away. Can it cause contamination?
    • A. 

      Yes. The lost staple could have landed on food, equipment, or a prep area.

    • B. 

      No. the lost stapel could have fell on the floor, garbage, or in your pocket.

  • 44. 
    Lee mixed some sanitizer solution according to the directions on the container. He then used it sanitize a clean prep table after the kitchen was closed. Can it cause contamination?
    • A. 

      Yes. he didnt follow the manufacture's direction in mixing the solution.

    • B. 

      No. he followed the manufacture's direction in mixing the solution. He also sanitized the table while it was not being used.

  • 45. 
    Anita needed to make several gallons of lemonade for a private outdoor party. She mixed the lemonade and served it in a new, galvanized tub. The tub was cleaned and sanitized before use. Can it cause contamination?
    • A. 

      Yes. Zinc from the tub could be transferred to the lemonade

    • B. 

      No. the was completely clean.

  • 46. 
    Lisa used a new saucepan to make hollandaise sauce. The pan had a copper base but had stainless steel on the inside. Can it cause contamination?
    • A. 

      Yes. The food can touch the copper because of the stainless steel on the inside.

    • B. 

      No. The food cannot touch the copper because of the stainless steel on the inside.

  • 47. 
    Pete carried a large tray of dirty dishes to the dishwashing area. A wine glass fell off the tray and broke on a prep table, near some chopped onion. He cleaned up the glass and rinsed the onions in a colander. Can it cause contamination?
    • A. 

      Yes. Glass could still be in the onions

    • B. 

      No. Glass is not in the onions

  • 48. 
    Marlene put a large stock pot on the shelf below the dishwasher detergent. Can it cause contamination?
    • A. 

      Yes. If the detergent container leaks, detergent would get into the stock pot.

    • B. 

      No. the detergent wont leak.

  • 49. 
    Avery put vegetables dressed in vinaigrette on a pewter platter. Can it cause contamination?
    • A. 

      Yes. Lead from the platter could be transferred to the food.

    • B. 

      No. Lead wont be transferred into the food.

  • 50. 
    Paul poured some detergent from  its original container into a smaller bottle. When he was finished using it, he put both bottles back into the chemical-storage area. Can it cause contamination?
    • A. 

      Yes. He did not label the smaller bottle. It could be mistaken for a different substance and contaminate food.

    • B. 

      No. he told everyone what it was.

  • 51. 
    Jennie wore false fingernails to work. She made potato salad and hamburger patties for most on the morning. Can it cause contamination?
    • A. 

      Yes. One of her false fingernails could come loose and get into the food. The false nails could also be a biological contaminant. False nails are hard to clean under and can hide dirt and other contaminants.

    • B. 

      No. he nail glue is very good.

  • 52. 
    The symptoms that could indicate a customer is having an allergic reaction.
    • A. 

      Loss of consciousness, Itchy scalp, hives, swollen face, abdominal cramps, shortness of breath, tightening in the throat.

    • B. 

      Bruising, sneezing, coughing, swollen abdomen, increased appetite, tightening in the chest, uncontrollable laughing.

  • 53. 
    These type of food is a common food allergen.
    • A. 

      Tea, melons, potatoes, mushrooms, tomatoes, citrus fruit, green peppers, squash, eggplant, rice, and rice products

    • B. 

      Cod, wheat flour, peanut butter, crab legs, pecan pie, soybeans, omelet, vanilla ice cream

  • 54. 
    Eggs and peanuts dangerous for people with which condition?
    • A. 

      FAT TOM

    • B. 

      Food allergies

    • C. 

      Chemical sensitivity

    • D. 

      Poor personal hygiene

  • 55. 
    Cooking tomato sauce in a copper pot can cause which food borne illness?
    • A. 

      Hemorrhagic colitis

    • B. 

      Food borne infection

    • C. 

      Toxic metal poisoning

    • D. 

      Staphylococcal gastroenteritis

  • 56. 
    To prevent chemical contamination, chemicals should be stored _____________ food and utensils.
    • A. 

      Next to

    • B. 

      Above

    • C. 

      Separate from

    • D. 

      In the same area as

  • 57. 
    Itching and tightening of the throat are symptoms of what?
    • A. 

      Hepatitis A

    • B. 

      Food allergy

    • C. 

      Hemorrhagic colitis

    • D. 

      Ciguatera fish poisoning

  • 58. 
    To prevent food allergens from being transferred to food,
    • A. 

      Clean and sanitize utensils before use

    • B. 

      Buy food from approved, reputable suppliers

    • C. 

      Store cold food at 41*F or lower

    • D. 

      Avoid pewter tableware and copper cookware

  • 59. 
    • A. 

      Inspection reports, HACCP program, invoices

    • B. 

      Human element, building interior, building exterior

    • C. 

      Plant toxins,temperature logs, personal hygiene

    • D. 

      Cleaning schedules, labeling procedures, FAT TOM