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Nonverbal Quiz

88 Questions  I  By Dmcreynolds
Nonverbal Quiz
This quiz tests basic knowledge of nonverbal communication.   Key terms and concepts are covered.  

  
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Question Excerpt

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1.  1.       Nonverbal communication (NVC) examines the meaning we assign to nonverbal cues. It does not, however, deal with the meaning tied to the absence of those cues.
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2.  1.       The study of NVC clearly separates behavior into either the verbal category of the nonverbal category.
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3.  1.       Most people think NVC is about the encoding, not the decoding part, which is important.
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4.  1.       Most NVC is processed on the left side of the brain.
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5.  1.       While one side of the brain is most active during verbal or nonverbal processing, both sides play some part.
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6.  1.       Sometimes we encode nonverbal behavior without conscious awareness.
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7.  1.       **We must decode nonverbal behavior with conscious awareness
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8.  1.       The study of NVC deals with human behaviors, not nonhuman factors.
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9.  1.       A study that examines how people respond to space in group settings is a form of proxemics.
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10.  1.       The communicator’s body shape, skin color, appearance, height, and weight are called artifacts.
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11.  1.       Posture can reveal degree of attention, status, and liking, but is not an indicator of emotional state.
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12.  1.       Scratching one’s head or smoothing one’s dress are forms of adaptors.
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13.  1.       Vocal behavior examines what is said and how it is said.
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14.  1.       The use of disfluencies (like um, er, uh, etc.) are not part of NVC because they are strictly verbal.
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15.  1.       Verbal and nonverbal behaviors are difficult to clearly separate.
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16.  1.       An example of the repeating function is paraphrasing what you just said.
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17.  1.       Someone says something upsetting to you, but smiles. This is an example of the conflicting function.
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18.  1.       Conflicting signals, if they are not followed by clarifying information, may result in hostile feelings in the receiver.
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19.  1.       Sometimes, conflicting signals serve a helpful or enjoyable purpose.
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20.  1.       If someone seems to be smiling, but their body movement seems to indicate something else, people usually trust the smiling.
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21.  1.       Unlike adults, children faced with a negative verbal and a positive nonverbal trust the verbal more.
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22.  1.       Complementing refers to one nonverbal that supports another nonverbal.
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23.  1.       Substituting refers to using a nonverbal to completely take the place of a verbal, and it can sometimes be misinterpreted.
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24.  1.       An accenting nonverbal attenuates or strengthens a verbal message.
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25.  1.       Most rules for regulating conversations through nonverbal behaviors are explicit, not implicit.
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26.  1.       The current understanding of the nature/nurture debate regarding human behaviors is that it is probably a bit of both.
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27.  1.       Children develop language skills even when isolated from interpersonal contact with others.
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28.  1.       There is support for the idea that the determining characteristics of facial attractiveness are somewhat universal.
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29.  1.       Many nonverbal behaviors are exhibited by children blind from birth, supporting that some level of “nature” exists in NVC.
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30.  1.       The use of congenitally blind children in research is the attempt to control for the effects of socialization.
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31.  1.       Children blind from birth seem to exhibit the same level of intensity as sighted children when displaying emotion nonverbally.
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32.  1.       While it can be determined empirically that children acquire some level of norms of NV behavior genetically, the emotion felt cannot be clearly determined, which complicates research.
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33.  1.       DET suggests facial expressions are acquired primarily via socialization, not genetics.
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34.  1.       Most modern researchers accept that socialization plays some role in norms of NVC.
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35.  1.       Research on monozygotic twins has revealed many similarities in some variables likely to genetically related, but non-genetic factors account for about half of the variance.
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36.  1.       No studies have found a connection between the body language behaviors of monozygotic twins.
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37.  1.       Some of the behavioral similarities between nonhuman and human primates are due to common social and biological problems.
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38.  1.       All species seem to assign the same social meaning to the bared-teeth display.
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39.  1.       Nonhuman and human primates, infants, and children all differ in the way they use eye contact during greetings.
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40.  1.       Eibl-Eibesfeldt asserts that no universal facial, proxemic, or gestural behaviors exist.
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41.  1.       Research seems to support some universal relationship between certain facial movements and specific emotions.
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42.  1.       Display rules are driven by two cultural dimensions, individualism/collectivism and certainty/uncertainty.
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43.  1.       The one emotion with the most universal facial nonverbal attributions is fear.
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44.  1.       Cultural similarities in some seem to be present in people’s use of nonverbals, but not in the interpretation of those nonverbals.
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45.  1.       Social intelligence is conceptually the same as cognitive intelligence.
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46.  1.       Social communication is determined entirely by one’s ability to decode nonverbal cues.
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47.  1.       The roles each participant in a social interaction play is not predetermined; it is negotiated until there is a common understanding of those roles.
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48.  1.       Most of our abilities to encode and decode nonverbal signals are innate, not learned.
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49.  1.       Practicing nonverbal communication (NVC), by itself, has little effect; feedback is required in order to improve encoding and decoding.
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50.  1.       Research has found that mothers are significantly better in judging nonverbal cues than those without children, which means being a mother causes better nonverbal skills.
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51.  1.        “Reinforcers” can be verbal as well as nonverbal.
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52.  1.       People are more likely to be wary of another person’s nonverbal persuasive abilities than with another person’s verbal persuasive abilities.
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53.  1.       Most research on NVC has focused on deception and attitudes; very little research exists on the emotional component.
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54.  1.       A nonverbal “social footprint” might include the types of car people choose, the way they decorate they homes, and the way they present themselves online.
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55.  1.       Research methods that examine NVC often must use “thin slice” stimuli, which might include interacting with a participant over an extended period.
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56.  1.       Using posed emotions in studies of NVC assumes the encoded emotion is expressed appropriately.
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57.  1.       The use of a naturalistic setting in the IPT makes it easy to determine which cue channel is operative.
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58.  1.       Research indicates that our impressions of others’ extraversion are reasonably accurate, even after a very short exposure.
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59.  1.       Research supports that there is a great difference between men and women concerning  the decoding of nonverbal cues. Females decode more accurately than males, but the results are quite inconsistent.
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60.  1.       After about 30 years of age, people’s decoding skills tend to decline.
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61.  1.       Those that score very highly on nonverbal decoding skills tend to be more manipulative.
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62.  1.       Research has found that watching TV may increase the abilities of children to decode emotional expression.
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63.  1.       Asperger’s syndrome results in poor verbal abilities, but actually increases the ability to decode facial expressions.
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64.  1.       Decoding nonverbal messages based on judgments of another’s voice is generally more accurate than judgments of the visual channel.
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65.  1.       **A sad mood increases our awareness of others, resulting in increased nonverbal decoding accuracy.
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66.  1.       Defining nonverbal encoding is more complex than nonverbal decoding.
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67.  1.       Highly spontaneous emotionally expressive people would make good poker players.
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68.  1.       Similar to the development of decoding abilities, the ability to encode emotional messages tends to increase through childhood.
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69.  1.       The notion that good decoders are good encoders has been strongly supported in the research.
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70.  1.       The length of a student’s participation tends to be longer as class size increases.
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71.  1.       While where a student sits seems to affect participation, the initial choice is fairly random.
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72.  1.       When forced into situations that are “too close for comfort,” we try to decrease the psychological distance.
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73.  1.       “Nonscreeners” tend to sense more stimuli.
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74.  1.       Compared to people in the US, those in Brazil are more aware of the preciseness of time.
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75.  1.       Our interaction style is influenced more by the diversity of those we communicate with than by the number of people in the encounter.
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76.  1.       Increased outside temperatures lead to greater likelihood of hostility, but hostility tends to decrease after temperatures rise to extreme discomfort.
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77.  1.       When in a two-person conversation that we’d like to terminate, we are less likely to leave when a third party joins
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78.  1.       **The social facilitation effect can make individual performance measures less valid.
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79.  1.       Couples with few jointly acquired decorative objects in their home are those that research has found to have less commitment.
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80.  1.       Students that decorate their dorm rooms with home and high school-related decorations tend to be the better-performing students.
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81.  1.       Color preferences are generally constant, regardless of the context.
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82.  1.       Research on the effects of color on human interaction is inconclusive; few reliable inferences can be made.
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83.  1.       Noise in the environment has little effect on performance, even when the noise is uncontrollable and unpredictable.
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84.  1.       There is a relationship between the brightness of light in an environment and the degree of intimate communication.
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85.  1.       Physical barriers between people seem to increase psychological distance in many studies.
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86.  1.       There is a negative relationship between the status and power of individuals in organizations and communication accessibility.
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87.  1.       The greater the accessibility allowed by the communication setting, the greater the task-oriented communication.
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88.  1.       Proximity tends to reduce attraction and friendship.
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