Mttc English Practice Test

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Mttc English Practice Test
Mttc english practice test

  
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  • 1. 
    An English teacher has students writetheir own poetry during an integratedunit about poets from the United States.Before the students can submit theirpoems to the teacher, they must readthem aloud to at least three people. Theprimary benefit of this requirement willbe that it encourages the students to:
    • A. 

      Exercise caution when selecting topics for their writing.

    • B. 

      Identify overused sentiments or expressions by soliciting the opinions of other people.

    • C. 

      Select poetic structures that are readily understood by others.

    • D. 

      Consider the clarity of the language they have chosen by using it in a second modality.


  • 2. 
    When teaching literature, the books ofVirginia Hamilton, Sandra Cisneros,Laurence Yep, and N. Scott Momadayare particularly useful in:
    • A. 

      Encouraging students to resist societal pressures.

    • B. 

      Introducing students to the diversity of cultures in the United States.

    • C. 

      Encouraging students' interest in United States history.

    • D. 

      Familiarizing students with regional literature.


  • 3. 
    Which of the following events began thetransition from Old English to MiddleEnglish?
    • A. 

      The Viking invasions of the ninth century

    • B. 

      The Norman Conquest of 1066

    • C. 

      The Statute of Pleading in 1362

    • D. 

      The printing of the King James Bible in 1611


  • 4. 
    One of the most recognizable novelisticgenres in British literature is the comedyof manners, which is concerned with theconflict between characters formed byparticular social and cultural conditions.Which of the following writers is bestknown for her work in this genre?
    • A. 

      Emily Brontë

    • B. 

      Elizabeth Gaskell

    • C. 

      Jane Austen

    • D. 

      Charlotte Brontë


  • 5. 
    Read the excerpt below, from the poem"Nuyorican Lament" by Gloria Vando;then answer the question that follows.San Juan you're not for me.My cadence quails and stumbleson your ancient stones:there is an inner beat hereto be reckoned with—a seis chorreao, a plena,an inbred @Oyeeee!and @mira tú! against whichmy Manhattan (sorrywrong island) responses fell flat.@Vaya! How can I deal with that?And yet . . . once, long ago,your beach was mine; Luquillowas my bridle path to ride—back then, before the turning of the tidewhen Teddy's blue-eyed shillssecured the hilland tried in vain to blotthe language out. . .In this poem, the poet moves back andforth between English and Spanishprimarily to:
    • A. 

      Emphasize her skills as a bilingual poet.

    • B. 

      Make the poem more accessible to Spanish speakers.

    • C. 

      Enhance the poem by adding a splash of local color.

    • D. 

      Reflect a cultural identification with San Juan.


  • 6. 
    In a conversation, speakers can bestadjust their message to improve itseffectiveness by analyzing:
    • A. 

      The listener's attitudes.

    • B. 

      The length of time already spent on the conversation.

    • C. 

      The social context of the conversation.

    • D. 

      The listener's feedback.


  • 7. 
    Which of the following sentencesviolates the principles of conventionalsyntax?
    • A. 

      Where is the rock greenly sleeping?

    • B. 

      Shun the fruminous Bandersnatch!

    • C. 

      The quertl chased from the room.

    • D. 

      It could have been; but it was not to be.


  • 8. 
    Read the excerpt below, from A Story A Story, An African Tale Retold, by Gail E. Haley; thenanswer the question that follows."Oh Nyame," said Ananse, bowing low, "here is the price you ask for your stories: Osebo theleopard-of-the-terrible-teeth, Mmboro the hornets-who-sting-like-fire, and Mmoatia the fairywhom-men-never-see."Nyame the Sky God called together all the nobles of his court and addressed them in a loud voice: "Little Ananse, the spider man, has paid me the price I ask for my stories. Sing his praise. I command you.""From this day and going on forever," proclaimed the Sky God, "my stories belong to Ananse and shall be called 'Spider Stories.' ""Eeeee, Eeeee, Eeeee," shouted all the assemble nobles.So Ananse took the golden box of stories back to earth, to the people of his village. And when he opened the box all the stories scattered to the corners of the world, including this one.Which of the following commonlyexpressed themes in children's literatureis best exemplified by this passage?
    • A. 

      The importance of obedience

    • B. 

      An explanation of how things came to be the way they are

    • C. 

      A belief in the magic of storytelling

    • D. 

      The triumph of achieving the impossible


  • 9. 
    Read the excerpt below from Rebecca Harding Davis's Life in the Iron Mills; then answer thethree questions that follow.A cloudy day: do you know what that is in a town of iron-works? The sky sank down beforedawn, muddy, flat, immovable. The air is thick, clammy with the breath of crowded humanbeings. It stifles me. I open the window, and, looking out, can scarcely see through the rain the grocer's shop opposite, where a crowd of drunken workers are puffing Lynchburg tobacco in their pipes. I can detect the scent through all the foul smells ranging loose in the air. . . Can you see how foggy the day is? As I stand here, idly tapping the window-pane, and lookingout through the rain at the dirty back-yard and the coalboats below, fragments of an old story float up before me,—a story of this old house into which I happened to come to-day. You may think it a tiresome story enough, as foggy as the day, sharpened by no sudden flashes of pain or pleasure.—I know: only the outline of a dull life, that long since, with thousands of dull lives like its own, was vainly lived and lost: thousands of them,—massed, vile, slimy lives, like those of the torpid lizards in yonder stagnant water-butt.—Lost? There is a curious point for you to settle, my friend, who study psychology in a lazy, dilettante way. Stop a moment. I am going to be honest. This is what I want you to do. I want you to hide your disgust, take no heed to your clean clothes,and come right down with me,—here, into the thickest of the fog and mud and foul effluvia. I want you to hear this story. There is a secret down there, in this nightmare fog, that has lain dumb for centuries.This passage best exemplifies which ofthe following types of fiction?
    • A. 

      Folklore

    • B. 

      Realist

    • C. 

      Gothic

    • D. 

      Idealist


  • 10. 
    In this passage, the author primarilyaddresses which of the followingnineteenth century issues?
    • A. 

      The environmental damage caused by industrialization

    • B. 

      The trend of intemperance in industrial centers

    • C. 

      The darker side of American industrial prosperity

    • D. 

      The social mobility brought about by industrialization


  • 11. 
    In writing a literary response to thispassage, it would be most appropriate toapproach the text through an analysis of:
    • A. 

      Imagery.

    • B. 

      Conflict.

    • C. 

      Character.

    • D. 

      Symbolism.


  • 12. 
    A teacher wants students to developresources for revising their writing andwants them to be comfortable sharingtheir written drafts with others. Whichof the following strategies would mosteffectively address both of these goals?
    • A. 

      Modeling procedures for small group revision

    • B. 

      Beginning each writing period with a brainstorming session

    • C. 

      Asking students to read their drafts aloud to the class

    • D. 

      Showing examples of final drafts to the students


  • 13. 
    The bandwagon approach to influencingpeople's decisions or behavior istypically characterized by:
    • A. 

      The use of vague or meaningless slogans.

    • B. 

      Efforts to give negative information without proof.

    • C. 

      The personal testimony of a wellknown person.

    • D. 

      Appeals to the human urge to belong to a group.


  • 14. 
    Students watch a videotaped news storyabout events that took place during apolitical protest. The camera operatorhas taken only "live" footage. Toinitiate a discussion of the methods thatcan be used to create visual messages,which of the following questions shouldthe teacher ask first?
    • A. 

      Which elements of the protest did the camera operator choose to record?

    • B. 

      Does this footage make you want to participate in a protest like this one?

    • C. 

      Why was the camera operator sent to videotape this political protest?

    • D. 

      Will viewers understand what happened during this protest?


  • 15. 
    Read the passage below; then answer the question that follows.In contrast to European fairy tales and folk tales, American Indian folk tales and legendsare not always self-contained stories but are frequently portions of lengthy episodes thatflow one into the next. These episodes often reach back to a nation's most ancienttraditions.Characters in American Indian stories often transform their personalities unexpectedlyand without explanation. Coyote, a prominent figure in southwestern Indian tales, is oneexample of this type of character. One minute Coyote is manipulative and cowardly, whilein the next he is brave and powerful. He is much like a "shape-shifter" or trickster and hisbehavior reflects the dualities of nature.These ancient tales are told for adults and children alike, often within the context ofimportant religious ceremonies. They serve to teach people lessons about human andanimal behavior. If one tries to apply a "Western" aesthetic to American Indian tales, onecan miss their power and beauty.Which of the following facts from thepassage best supports the writer'scontention that American Indian talesare quite different from European folktales?
    • A. 

      Coyote, a prominent figure in southwestern Indian tales, is a character that can change personalities unexpectedly.

    • B. 

      The lengthy episodes of which many American Indian folk tales are a part often reach back to a nation's most ancient traditions.

    • C. 

      American Indian folk tales are generally not self-contained stories, but parts of longer tales that comprise many stories.

    • D. 

      American Indian folk tales serve to teach people lessons about human and animal behavior.


  • 16. 
    Read the excerpt below from Ralph Ellison's novel Invisible Man; then answer the two questions that follow.I am an invisible man. No, I am not a spook like those who haunted Edgar Allan Poe; nor am Ione of your Hollywood-movie ectoplasms. I am a man of substance, of flesh and bone, fiber and liquids⎯and I might even be said to possess a mind. I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me. Like the bodiless heads you see sometimes in circus sideshows, it is as though I have been surrounded by mirrors of hard, distorting glass. When they approach me they see only my surroundings, themselves, or figments of their imagination⎯indeed, everything and anything except me.Nor is my invisibility exactly a matter of a biochemical accident to my epidermis. Thatinvisibility to which I refer occurs because of a peculiar disposition of the eyes of those withwhom I come in contact. A matter of the construction of their inner eyes, those eyes with which they look through their physical eyes upon reality. I am not complaining, nor am I protesting either. It is sometimes advantageous to be unseen, although it is most often rather wearing on the nerves. Then too, you're constantly being bumped against by those of poor vision. Or again, you often doubt if you really exist. You wonder whether you aren't simply a phantom in other people's minds. Say, a figure in a nightmare which the sleeper tries with all his strength to destroy. It's when you feel like this that, out of resentment, you begin to bump people back. And, let me confess, you feel that way most of the time. You ache with the need to convince yourself that you do exist in the real world, that you're part of all the sound and anguish, and you strike out with your fists, you curse and you swear to make them recognize you. And, alas, it's seldom successful.Which of the following statements mostaccurately identifies the significance ofthe narrator's invisibility?
    • A. 

      The narrator's invisibility is the fantastic science fiction premise that introduces the theme of an alien's isolation among humankind.

    • B. 

      The concept of the narrator's invisibility symbolizes his personal dilemma stemming from a sense of social exclusion.

    • C. 

      The narrator's feeling of invisibility reflects his perception that other people are incapable of appreciating his superiority.

    • D. 

      The narrator's invisibility represents the first stage in his recognition that he has died and now exists as a ghost among the living.


  • 17. 
    The voice of this passage was mostlikely employed by the author for thepurpose of:
    • A. 

      Involving the reader more immediately in the experience of the author's own writing process.

    • B. 

      Creating a sense of the uncanny through the reader's shared experience of this character's strange situation.

    • C. 

      Drawing the reader in on a direct, personal level to the narrator's emotional experience.

    • D. 

      Reinforcing the narrator's self centered egotism and aloof detachment from those around him.


  • 18. 
    Which of the following techniquesis most effective in enhancing readingcomprehension?
    • A. 

      Refraining from considering implications of the text until one has completed the reading

    • B. 

      Reading the text slowly enough so that every word can be understood

    • C. 

      Generating questions about the text before and during the course of reading

    • D. 

      Attempting to read the text in its entirety in an uninterrupted period


  • 19. 
    When reviewing students' readingjournal responses to a play, an Englishteacher notices that students' variouscultural and personal experiences resultin their having different interpretationsof the text. The teacher can enhance allstudents' learning most effectively inthis situation by:
    • A. 

      Providing the class with professional critiques of the text from different perspectives.

    • B. 

      Encouraging students to share their interpretations of the text in a class discussion.

    • C. 

      Dividing the class into discussion groups whose members have similar interpretations of the text.

    • D. 

      Responding in students' reading journals with an explanation of the teacher's interpretation of the text.


  • 20. 
    Read the math problem below; thenanswer the question that follows.There are 320 children enteringthe first grade at BriarwoodElementary. 85 percent of thesestudents have been vaccinated.How many students still need toreceive their shots?A high school math teacher requiresstudents to write a step by stepdescription of the way they solve wordproblems such as the one shown above.Which of the following is the primarybenefit of having students write abouttheir solutions to math problems?
    • A. 

      Students have multiple opportunities to practice and memorize a variety of math facts.

    • B. 

      The students and the teacher gain insight into the thought processes and problem-solving strategies that individual students use.

    • C. 

      The teacher can provide students with more difficult and complex math problems.

    • D. 

      The teacher and the students can make meaningful connections between school math problems and the uses of math in everyday life.


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