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WAN Technologies

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WAN Technologies
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{{networkplusstudyguidenavigationheader}} {{networkplusstudyguidenavigationheader}}
-== WANG ==+== WAN ==
Now that you have a firm grip on the core of the Network+ exam, LAN administration and troubleshooting, you can begin to study the various modes and methods of operation for WAN access. '''A WAN, or Wide Area Network, is a group of interconnected LAN’s; usually, WAN access refers to Internet access.''' You are probably intimately familiar with some WAN access technologies, such as POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service, or Dial-Up), but are less familiar with OC3 and FDDI. This section of our guide will help you understand these widely varying Wide Area Network technologies. Now that you have a firm grip on the core of the Network+ exam, LAN administration and troubleshooting, you can begin to study the various modes and methods of operation for WAN access. '''A WAN, or Wide Area Network, is a group of interconnected LAN’s; usually, WAN access refers to Internet access.''' You are probably intimately familiar with some WAN access technologies, such as POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service, or Dial-Up), but are less familiar with OC3 and FDDI. This section of our guide will help you understand these widely varying Wide Area Network technologies.
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== I could sit on the shitter for days! =/<br> == == I could sit on the shitter for days! =/<br> ==

Revision as of 08:12, 5 December 2008

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Contents

WAN

Now that you have a firm grip on the core of the Network+ exam, LAN administration and troubleshooting, you can begin to study the various modes and methods of operation for WAN access. A WAN, or Wide Area Network, is a group of interconnected LAN’s; usually, WAN access refers to Internet access. You are probably intimately familiar with some WAN access technologies, such as POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service, or Dial-Up), but are less familiar with OC3 and FDDI. This section of our guide will help you understand these widely varying Wide Area Network technologies.

I could sit on the shitter for days! =/


'Ravenisms'


Let the challenge... begin!

You must be quicker, young warrior!

Time is not on your side!

You had gold in your sights but sawdust in your brains!

Either you did not listen to your heads or there was nothing worth listening to in the first place!

May the luck of the Raven's Eye be with you!

Hold your head high, young warrior!

You have battled bravely and you leave us with honour!

POTS

Plain Old Telephone Service, or as it is affectionately known, POTS, is one of the oldest WAN access technologies and remains the most popular in most parts of the world. It utilizes phone networks and analog-to-digital modems to send information over the telephone line. One of the drawbacks of POTS WAN access is that in order to connect, you to have to establish a POTS “hand-shake” which takes around one or two minutes. Additionally, POTS is a very slow access method; most people connect via POTS at a speed of about 56 Kb/S, or 7 KB/S. However, due to its inexpensive price and the fact that it uses existing infrastructure, it remains a viable option even today.

ISDN

Integrated Service Data Network (ISDN) is a now almost-obsolete technology that allows for an internet connection via a special, reserved line set up by the telecommunications company. It usually consists of two 64 Kbps "B" channels for a maximum data transfer rate of 128 Kbps, or 16 KB/S. Though fast as compared to older standards, this technology is outdated and has been replaced by newer “broadband” technologies, such as DSL or cable.

DSL

Digital Subscriber Line, or DSL, is arguably the successor to ISDN. It also utilizes a special line set up by the telecom company, but utilizes a special “DSL” modem to translate the high-speed DSL signal to a network-friendly language. DSL can be as slow as 256 Kbps and some of the fastest DSL lines operate at speeds exceeding 10 Mbps. DSL is generally used in small business/office or home connection settings.

Cable

Cable utilizes a traditional coaxial cable to transmit network signals. Typically, one would sign up for a cable connection through a cable company (the same ones who provide cable TV access). Cable requires a cable modem to translate between the cable signal and the Layer 2 segments, and typically costs a bit more than its DSL counterparts. Cable can operate at speeds exceeding 60 Mbps and would be used by small to medium-sized business applications and in many home settings.

T1/T2/T3

T(X) lines are dedicated lines set up by a telecom company between a remote site and the network backbone. T1 operates at 1.544 Mbps, T2 at 6.312 Mbps, and T3 at 44.376 Mbps. All you have to know about T1/2/3 is that these lines are typically used by larger businesses and are far more expensive than the traditional broadband connection as they are dedicated and always reliable.

ATM

Asynchronous Transfer Mode, or ATM, uses fiber optic cable to achieve speeds exceeding 600 Mbps, and is only used in large-scale, “backbone” operations. ATM can accommodate such varying technologies as traditional phone service, data service, and even VOIP service (Voice over IP).

OC1/OC3/OC(X)

OC(X), or “Optical Carrier” WAN access, utilizes SONET fiber-optic technology to allow for speeds exceeding 50 Gbps, though OC1 operates at “only” 51 Mbps. Only large companies or backbone operations would need such speed.

Review Time

1. Which of the following would you not recommend to a small business wishing for an affordable, “always-on” connection to the Internet?

a. ISDN

b. Cable

c. DSL

d. OC3

2. Which of the following utilizes fiber optic technology?

a. POTS

b. T1

c. T3

d. ATM

e. T2

3. Which of the following does not require a dedicated physical line to the phone company?


a. T1

b. T2

c. T3

d. DSL

Answers:

1. OC3 is only used for Internet Backbone and would be too expensive for a normal small business to utilize. The answer is D

2. Only ATM uses fiber optic technology. The answer is D.

3. DSL, though called a “Digital Subscriber Line,” is not a truly “Dedicated” line in the same sense that T1, T2, and T3 are. The answer is D.

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