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#1 thelaststop

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Posted 09 August 2006 - 07:21 PM

Hey all,

Just looking over the different classes of IP addresses and was wondering how one would be able to tell which class an IP address belonged to just by looking at it. This question came up on the practice exam and I got it wrong.

Thanks!
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#2 NickHeel

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Posted 09 August 2006 - 09:19 PM

Class A: 1.0.0.1 to 126.255.255.254; Supports 16 million hosts on each of 127 networks.
Class B: 128.1.0.1 to 191.255.255.254; Supports 65,000 hosts on each of 16,000 networks.
Class C: 192.0.1.1 to 223.255.254.254; Supports 254 hosts on each of 2 million networks.
Class D: 224.0.0.0 to 239.255.255.255; Reserved for multicast groups.
Class E: 240.0.0.0 to 254.255.255.254; Reserved.

Ranges 127.x.x.x are reserved for loopback tests, for example, 127.0.0.1. Ranges 255.255.255.255 are used to broadcast to all hosts on the local network.
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#3 dbough

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Posted 10 August 2006 - 03:04 AM

Exceptions to the rule:
These are private IPs - they cannot be assigned by a RIR

10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255
172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255
192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255

These were implemented because we're just plain running out of new IP addresses (in the IPv4 scheme anyhow.)

They should all be considered class C and carry a subnet of 255.255.255.0
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#4 laldrich

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Posted 10 August 2006 - 04:11 AM

Excellent posts, all!
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#5 thelaststop

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Posted 10 August 2006 - 07:55 AM

Awesome! Thanks to all. I didn't find the range of IP addresses in either of the books I was using, just the reserved set of IP addresses.

#6 James

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Posted 10 August 2006 - 10:01 AM

The Class-Octet Table

Class

First Octet

Example

Default Subnet

Typical Application

A (netid . hostid . hostid . hostid)

1-126

17.14.22.211

255.0.0.0

University Network System

B (netid. netid. hostid. hostid)

128-191

143.144.1.1

255.255.0.0

Corporate System or Hospital Network

C (netid. netid. netid. hostid)

192-223

204.213.288.222

255.255.255.0

Small Business, Home Internet Connection


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#7 bas

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 06:03 AM

So what if my girlfriend is on a 142.24.20.0 /31 but im a subnet 0?
Can we still summarize? Or at least make it a VLSM relationship.....

Just checking if my picture will show this time...haha

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#8 luckyiyke

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 02:15 AM

hello nickfled or any one around,
plz i want u to remind me how you got those number of hosts and the networks eg. in the class A IP ads., you got 16 million hosts on the 127 networks.i have and idea but want you to strick this out for me.
thanks as u provide the solution for me
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#9 Samasters

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Posted 09 January 2008 - 05:21 PM

I dont know if this is the right place to post this, maybe i should've created a new topic, but anyways.. I know that there are Class D, E and F ip addresses, what do these do? and like, how do you know if the ip addresses are of these types?

#10 karlwies

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 09:11 PM

QUOTE(dbough @ Aug 10 2006, 04:04 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Exceptions to the rule:
These are private IPs - they cannot be assigned by a RIR

10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255
172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255
192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255

These were implemented because we're just plain running out of new IP addresses (in the IPv4 scheme anyhow.)

They should all be considered class C and carry a subnet of 255.255.255.0

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#11 damien275x

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Posted 20 January 2008 - 08:08 PM

ok thanks very much for clarifying

#12 deepak.panwar

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Posted 12 April 2008 - 11:16 PM

QUOTE(damien275x @ Jan 20 2008, 08:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
ok thanks very much for clarifying

wt is concept of valid-subnet numbers?????

#13 fly351

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 09:59 AM

QUOTE(cbrzana @ Aug 10 2006, 08:08 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
A neat trick to use:

Convert the first (leftmost) octet to binary. Now, where does the first zero occur? The first occurrence of a zero can determine what class this is. For example:

0110 0010 --> 1st Zero is in leftmost spot, class A
1001 1100 --> 1st Zero is in the spot after the first, class B
1101 0010 -->1st Zero in third spot, class C



wow thats awesome, thanks for that!! smile.gif

Edited by fly351, 27 August 2008 - 10:02 AM.

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