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#1 sxyTuXeDoZ

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 04:45 AM

If i want to be a Computer Security Specialist, what college major should I pursue?  Currently, I am going for Information Technology, but is Computer Science, or Computer Engineering a better choice?  Also I will be getting my Bachelor's for IT and Masters for Security Assurance.

please help

#2 USM_ITCboy

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 07:35 AM

QUOTE (sxyTuXeDoZ @ Mar 17 2011, 06:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If i want to be a Computer Security Specialist, what college major should I pursue?  Currently, I am going for Information Technology, but is Computer Science, or Computer Engineering a better choice?  Also I will be getting my Bachelor's for IT and Masters for Security Assurance.

please help


I personally would go with Information Technology. I've had this personal experience myself & I just graduated from a university in July 2010 so I'm pretty current on this. Computer Science is great but it deals more with knowledge of data structures than actual security of day-to-day IT operations. You code programs to show that knowledge in data structures. While technically you could say that you would be in security that includes patching holes in either open source software or software you code, to me, its not really the same as IT security where you're sniffing data packets, studying cryptography and business security practices, or understanding your network infrastructure so that you know where you have holes in security implementations. That's what security in Information Technology seems to be.


I'll show u a short descipt from my school's website:

IT: The Information Technology program at The University of Southern Mississippi prepares its graduates for careers in business and industry planning, implementing, and supporting complex information systems. requiring the development, management, and operation of computer systems and applications in networked environments.... The Networking concentration has specialization tracks in client-server networking, wide-area networking and information security.

CS: The School of Computing offers this program under the CSC designation and allows students to select concentrations in specific areas such as Software Engineering.

CET: The Electronics Engineering Technology (EET) program area offers opportunities for students desiring to learn about the field of electronics, computers, and other areas of engineering and technology. I used the EET description b/c there are only a FEW (Note: maybe only a single semester of classes) classes that separates Computer Engineering Tech from Electronics Engineering Tech.

http://www.cs.usm.edu/

Hope this helps. No matter where u go, look at a list of courses need for the degree to get another good idea of what you'll learn. & also remember that no school will duplicate the real world. Just do the classwork & absorb everything you can.

Edited by USM_ITCboy, 17 March 2011 - 07:36 AM.

A+ -  August 2010
Security+ - December 2010
CCENT - July 2011 (on track)
CCNA - November 2011 (on track)

#3 rdmoore2038

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Posted 22 March 2011 - 02:33 PM

QUOTE (sxyTuXeDoZ @ Mar 17 2011, 05:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If i want to be a Computer Security Specialist, what college major should I pursue?  Currently, I am going for Information Technology, but is Computer Science, or Computer Engineering a better choice?  Also I will be getting my Bachelor's for IT and Masters for Security Assurance.

please help

If you are going to enter into IT Security, I would suggest taking some networking coursework.  I am graduating in May from a 2-year college with a degree in Information Systems Technology and Networking Technologies.  I have found that the networking side is vital to being a Security minded professional.  If you have an understanding of how routers, switches, etc..operate, it makes it easier to help create a security plan.

#4 Emory Woolsey

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Posted 23 March 2011 - 11:51 PM

Computer security specialists are in growing demand as hackers and cyber-attacks become ever larger problems. Computer security is a sub-field within the larger discipline of computer science. The two most popular computer security degrees are the associates and bachelor's degrees. For more information you may get reference from here http://www.thedegreeexperts.com/dg-compute...nd-i.t-131.aspx





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