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Easy Way To Memorize Ports


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#1 cilenamo

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Posted 11 December 2009 - 11:26 AM

Does anyone have an easy way to memorize ports, besides using flashcards?  wacko.gif

Edited by cilenamo, 11 December 2009 - 11:27 AM.

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#2 dheskett

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Posted 12 December 2009 - 05:25 PM

QUOTE (cilenamo @ Dec 11 2009, 02:26 PM) <{<{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Does anyone have an easy way to memorize ports, besides using flashcards?  wacko.gif


I'd imagine it's different for everyone, for me it's a matter of taking interest in the function of each and what they relate to.
Try using a port search (there's lots over the web) and make sense of what they are relating to then test yourself...if that makes sense.  

IE; A lot have a direct security hazard in terms of malicious past identified parasitic programs, some people might draw correlations through that association, etc.
(The conventional uses vs. the known risks ?)

If anyone has any other advice, I'd be interested as well.
(This is something I'm going to have to focus on in the near future - the above was just how I've identified some and taken interest already to this point).

?

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#3 justonemsoke

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 02:30 PM

Change some letters into Numbers, draw things out, make things up to help associate.
Example

SMTP-5MTP-25

Telenet-T3l3net- 23

DNS - DN5 - 53



#4 techie7684

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 07:08 PM

QUOTE (justonemsoke @ Dec 21 2009, 04:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Change some letters into Numbers, draw things out, make things up to help associate.
Example

SMTP-5MTP-25

Telenet-T3l3net- 23

DNS - DN5 - 53


that is a good idea that you have, but one thing....it's Telnet...but yeah just try to associate the port numbers with something you'd remember...and make a connection to what they are...and before you realize it, you wont need the memorization process...you'll know them and you'll be glad you learned them, the test hits the port numbers pretty good...

#5 solidground

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 04:05 PM

Just something catchy:

FTP 21 2+1=3 3 letters
telnet 23 2*3=6 6 letters
HTTP HT 8T 80
POP3 PPO 110
SMTP 25 just memorized   biggrin.gif

that kind of stuff

#6 Stiemy

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Posted 07 January 2010 - 11:12 PM

flash cards work pretty good..

That's what I'm using..

Just find some 3 x 5 cards.....      FTP on one side, on the flip side   20 , 21

#7 flaco629

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 07:14 AM

Be sure to memorize whether they are tcp or udp ports as well.

#8 ljlabrie

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Posted 22 January 2010 - 05:51 AM

Can anyone tell me what a protocol address is?  It is part of the Address Resolution Protocol.  

I thought a protocol is kind of like a language and I never thought of languages having a location.

Also, wiki says " ARP may also be used as a simple announcement protocol. This is useful for updating other host's mapping of a hardware address when the sender's IP address or MAC address has changed." (http://en.wikipedia....lution_Protocol)  The announcement seems to only give the new protocol address and IP address.  How do the other computers know what the old addresses were so that they can delete them?

Please explain.  Thanks.


#9 barrybert

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Posted 30 May 2010 - 11:35 PM

That is a good idea that you have, but one thing....it's Telnet...but yeah just try to associate the port numbers with something you'd remember...and make a connection to what they are.


(Link removed)

Edited by spy1954, 31 May 2010 - 04:49 AM.


#10 timtom22

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Posted 31 May 2010 - 04:09 AM

QUOTE (ljlabrie @ Jan 22 2010, 09:51 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Can anyone tell me what a protocol address is?  It is part of the Address Resolution Protocol.  

I thought a protocol is kind of like a language and I never thought of languages having a location.

Also, wiki says " ARP may also be used as a simple announcement protocol. This is useful for updating other host's mapping of a hardware address when the sender's IP address or MAC address has changed." (http://en.wikipedia....lution_Protocol)  The announcement seems to only give the new protocol address and IP address.  How do the other computers know what the old addresses were so that they can delete them?

Please explain.  Thanks.


1) Protocol address, I assume, is whatever addressing scheme used by a particular protocol. Example, for TCP it is port #, for IP it is IP address, for Etherlet it is MAC address and so on.

2) Best part about ARP is, host doesn't have to know whether the IP to MAC address is current or not. ARP Cache has a default timer for deleting unused cached entries. For example, Host PC is A and neighbor is PC B. Assuming PC A has communicated with PC B in the past, A's ARP table will have an entry to resolve PC B's IP to MAC address. Now lets say, PC A doesn't communicate with PC B for an extended period of time, A's ARP will delete entry for PC B's IP to MAC address. And next time PC A wants to communicate with PC B, PC A will send out ARP broadcast looking for MAC address of PC B. Once PC B replies with its MAC, PC A will update ARP to reflect this mapping and OS or application will go on their merry way communicating with PC B. And the process will repeat.

This default cache delete timer value varies by manufacturer or OS, but can be adjustable. For some Cisco appliances, default delete timer for ARP table is 2 hours or it can be as little as few minutes for a switch.

Hope this clarifies a bit.

Edited by timtom22, 31 May 2010 - 04:30 AM.

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#11 mcdeeiis

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Posted 11 June 2010 - 03:24 AM

QUOTE (timtom22 @ May 31 2010, 05:09 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
1) Protocol address, I assume, is whatever addressing scheme used by a particular protocol. Example, for TCP it is port #, for IP it is IP address, for Etherlet it is MAC address and so on.

2) Best part about ARP is, host doesn't have to know whether the IP to MAC address is current or not. ARP Cache has a default timer for deleting unused cached entries. For example, Host PC is A and neighbor is PC B. Assuming PC A has communicated with PC B in the past, A's ARP table will have an entry to resolve PC B's IP to MAC address. Now lets say, PC A doesn't communicate with PC B for an extended period of time, A's ARP will delete entry for PC B's IP to MAC address. And next time PC A wants to communicate with PC B, PC A will send out ARP broadcast looking for MAC address of PC B. Once PC B replies with its MAC, PC A will update ARP to reflect this mapping and OS or application will go on their merry way communicating with PC B. And the process will repeat.

This default cache delete timer value varies by manufacturer or OS, but can be adjustable. For some Cisco appliances, default delete timer for ARP table is 2 hours or it can be as little as few minutes for a switch.

Hope this clarifies a bit.




Thanks TimTom, thats a good piece of info.
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Working as Systems Analyst & Programmer





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