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#1 gtrmdmn

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Posted 20 May 2008 - 09:34 AM

Is it true that you can use a router to route between two or more subnets on a lan, when all the PC's and the router are all connected to the same switch?  You would just set the gateway address for all the PC's to the router, which would then decide where the packets would go, even though everything is on the same switch?
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#2 gt-rob

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Posted 20 May 2008 - 12:24 PM

You bet.

Router-on-a-stick

http://en.wikipedia....ne-armed_router

#3 gtrmdmn

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Posted 21 May 2008 - 08:28 AM

Thanks everyone!

That is truely fascinating.  I am currently studying for CCNA ironically.  This part of Redwarrior's comment I really find interesing

"You can create virtual interfaces on that router for each of the networks you've given to those vlans and it will route traffic to them the same as if you had separate physical networks attached to it"

I sort of knew you could do this, but I thought you could do it with subinterfaces on a router without using vlans.  Apparently Cisco IOS doesnt do this.  I tried it in a simulator and got an error trying to assign an IP to a subinterface of a router without enabling 802.1Q first.  But if I understand correctly, when using Vlans, you could create as many subnets as you want, and only really need one router and one switch.  That's amazing, the traffic goes from a PC into a switch, then into a router, then back into the same switch from which it came, only now its on a different subnet?!  ohmy.gif
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#4 gtrmdmn

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Posted 22 May 2008 - 06:28 AM

Dude you're officially my hero.  Thanks for the explanations.  I follow you about everything, but dont have a firm grasp.  I need to study a lot of things, lol.  Just when you think, hey I've got N+,  turns out you really dont know @#&*!  smile.gif

That's crazy about the binding.  I've been trying to read up on WAN's as well.  ATM, Frame Relay, Sonet, MLPS, etc.  That seems to be the hardest to figure out in terms of cabling, multiplexing, equipment used and topologies.  Its hard to really understand when you've never seen it in real life.  All the material I've read will say such in such is a packet switched, multiplexed technology, and so on.  But none of it says:  A typical implementation would be Router > serial cable> connector type > etc.  I need to find material that will start you from the most basic WAN connections.  





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#5 gtrmdmn

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Posted 22 May 2008 - 06:51 AM

OMG I'm so sorry!    blush.gif

Yeah I like the challenging aspects of the field.  It gets me more determined to learn, and make more $!!!  Oh, and I would love to pick your brain.
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#6 nelsonheell

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 01:46 AM

Routing is work of router. It is one of the most famous and high frequencial device that of networking. It mostli control on wireless network connection.

#7 victosken

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 09:14 PM

Routing is  the process of selecting paths  in a network along which  network to send traffic.The  routing process usually  directs the transfer on the basis of routing tables  which maintain a register of  routes to destinations  on the network different.

#8 valenweiss

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 02:58 AM

Routing is the process of choosing paths in a network along which to send network traffic. It can perform more complex analysis to choose the optimal path for the packet. Routing algorithms fill routing tables with a variety of information. I am also from network line & need to gain my knowledge about Routing, & from here I have got lots of ideas about Routing, it will more helpful for me.





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