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What Is (ccna, Ccnp, & Ccie) Relevant To As A Degree/major?


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#1 NightWing310

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 07:02 AM

I'm 17 years old, taking Cisco Network Academy, and was wondering getting that certification what would it be equal in college? I thought someone said getting CCIE is like having a Masters in Computer Science. Or Networking, I forgot which one, but what would CCNA be equal  to?

#2 J1726

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 12:57 PM

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QUOTE(NightWing310 @ Feb 20 2008, 10:02 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm 17 years old, taking Cisco Network Academy, and was wondering getting that certification what would it be equal in college? I thought someone said getting CCIE is like having a Masters in Computer Science. Or Networking, I forgot which one, but what would CCNA be equal  to?




I'm new to this Forum but I think it offers a lot of Great information. You can never compare a degree to a certification period. A degree will give you a solid foundation for the future and for your field of choice. A certification will EXPIRE ... DEGREES DO NOT !!!!

#3 Rogage

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Posted 18 November 2008 - 02:39 PM

As for a degree relating directly to a cert, the two don't exactly stack the same.  Degrees are more tailored for engineers, business and management endeavors.

Certifications are more tailored for technicians.  The folks who get their hands dirty, so to speak.  It's a back door for those with experience to validate the knowledge they have gained to employers.  

Think of it this way:
Engineers make things
Technicians make things work

Nothing against engineers, but theory is different from hands-on.  This is also why certifications will expire after a time, but degrees endure.  The theory taught to degreed folk also entails the theory of research and, as a by-product, continued learning.

Hope I helped someone today.
Associates Degree in Electronic Engineering
Jones NCTI (130) Honor Graduate
A+, Network+, Security+
MCP (70-270)
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#4 djhss68

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Posted 17 January 2009 - 06:29 AM

QUOTE (redwarrior @ Jul 3 2008, 10:07 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I second/third what's already been said, but another point worth mentioning is that there really isn't (or at least wasn't when I was there) a degree that relates directly to networking.  Computer Science is more of a programming degree.  Computer engineering is more designing computer components themselves.  Even MIS or similar degrees are more geared towards managing an infrastructure.  I think any of these fields would be helpful to have a degree in prior to pursuing a degree in network engineering, but none would directly correlate.  Probably Management of Information Systems would be the closest that I know of.
At my local community college, they have a 2 year associates IT program with a base curriculum and then you get to choose your concentration(programming, networking, web development, etc.) The networking route has you learning the official Cisco curriculum for CCNA and then there is a class on Windows Server and some others on database administration and so forth.

I thought of enrolling in this. But then again I didn't want to limit my options. I began thinking if it might be better to get a traditional BS in Comp Sci since that seems to be what EVERY tech job asks for. Even the network admin jobs. I don't think I've ever seen an employer ask for an MIS degree in all the job sites I've perused over the last few months. They all want BS Comp Sci. So if you ask me, a Comp Sci degree is universally the most valuable degree one can get for the IT industry, no matter if you want to be a software engineer or network administrator/designer/engineer.

Doesn't mean it makes sense though. Personally, if I'm looking for a network administrator, and all things being equal, I'd hire the grad with the 2 year IT degree(w/networking conc.) I mentioned earlier rather than the 4 year degree in comp sci(where all you're really going to learn is coding Visual Basic, C++, Java, x86 assembly).






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