Musical History: salient characteristics of specific songs and shows

190 cards

F12- MUSHIST60


 
  
Created Dec 12, 2012
by
smeparz

 

 
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  Side A   Side B
1
Relation to original play and to Cinderella/symbolic use of slippers
 
My Fair Lady (Shaw, Pascal, Lerner, Loewe, 1956)
2
Relation to creative act
 
My Fair Lady (Shaw, Pascal, Lerner, Loewe, 1956)
3
His story becomes more her story
 
My Fair Lady (Shaw, Pascal, Lerner, Loewe, 1956)
4
flawed vocalities: she sings but can't speak well, he speaks well but can't sing (speech-song)
 
My Fair Lady (Shaw, Pascal, Lerner, Loewe, 1956)
5
Dubbing in movie version as problem
 
My Fair Lady (Shaw, Pascal, Lerner, Loewe, 1956)
6
Rex Harrison's speech-song
 
"Why Can't the English"
7
"putting on airs" (which she will take to the extreme)
 
"Wouldn't it be Loverly"
8
Abso-blooming-lutely
 
"Wouldn't it be Loverly"
9
Tin Pan Alley AABA (most of hers are; not his)
 
"Wouldn't it be Loverly"
10
speech-training phrases as basis for the song
 
"The Rain in Spain"
11
Tango, celebratory, gay subtext (cf. "Good Mornin'" in Singin' in the...
 
"The Rain in Spain"
12
her false reading of prefious song as romantic (like Freddy's latersong, "On the street...
 
"I Could Have Danced All Night"
13
Shows he might also learn from her (adapts "I Could Have Danced All Night")
 
"I've Grown Accustomed to Her Face"
14
alternates with earlier rants
 
"I've Grown Accustomed to Her Face"
15
transition: anger to hope
 
"I've Grown Accustomed to Her Face"
16
two roughly parallel tracks, with "play within a play"
 
Kiss Me, Kate (Shakespeare, Porter, 1948)
17
Lunt and Fontanne
 
Kiss Me, Kate (Shakespeare, Porter, 1948)
18
Porter's use of phrases from Shakespeare and archaic musical styles in play within play
 
Kiss Me, Kate (Shakespeare, Porter, 1948)
19
control issues
 
Kiss Me, Kate (Shakespeare, Porter, 1948)
20
monogamy issues
 
Kiss Me, Kate (Shakespeare, Porter, 1948)
21
importance of role-playing in relationships
 
Kiss Me, Kate (Shakespeare, Porter, 1948)
22
towns, rising sequence as excitement, parallel to "We Open in Venice"
 
"Another Openin'"
23
towns, falling sequence as boring routine
 
"We Open in Venice"
24
Binaca to suitors, derivation from Shakespeare ("I'm a miad mad to marry")
 
"Any Tom, Dick or Harry"
25
saucy wordplay
 
"Any Tom, Dick or Harry"
26
archaisms: canzona rhythm, madrigal style, harmonic
 
"Any Tom, Dick or Harry"
27
remembered waltz-song from Viennese operetta
 
"Wunderbar"
28
recalls basis of love, multilingual
 
"Wunderbar"
29
the big love song in operatic style
 
"So in Love"
30
sung by each when other isn't present
 
"So in Love"
31
build-up to breakthrough (Key change) within AABA structure
 
"So in Love"
32
"list" song, multi-lingual, very sexual
 
"Always True to You In My Fashion"
33
Shakespeare: exaggerated capitulation ("taking back") so both win (or think they've...
 
"I Am Ashamed That Women Are So Simple"
34
Audience participation
 
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (O'Brien, 1974)
35
1973 musical (O'Brien: "They Came from Dento High")
 
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (O'Brien, 1974)
36
old science fiction films from 50's meet old horror films from 30's, in pardoy of rock...
 
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (O'Brien, 1974)
37
parodies cold-war culture (Communism scare, pulp sensationalism, sexploitation)
 
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (O'Brien, 1974)
38
CAMP
 
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (O'Brien, 1974)
39
post-Stonewall
 
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (O'Brien, 1974)
40
Wizard of Oz references
 
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (O'Brien, 1974)
41
legacy of cult film
 
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (O'Brien, 1974)
42
Basis of characters (Frank N Furter, Riff Raff, Magenta, Criminologist, Brad & Janet)
 
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (O'Brien, 1974)
43
monstrous queer dies (genre convention)
 
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (O'Brien, 1974)
44
invitation to remember (specific film references), floating lips, androgynous
 
"Scinece Fiction/ Double Feature"
45
parody of gay bar, mixed gender
 
"The Time Warp"
46
dance as drug, "how-to" (dance craze)
 
"The Time Warp"
47
"controlling alternativity in performance"
 
"The Time Warp"
48
sexual ambivalence
 
"Sweet Transvestite"
49
burlesque (monstor and scientist), mashup of styles
 
"Sweet Transvestite"
50
Charles Atlas + Frankenstein
 
"I Can Make You a Man"
51
blasphemy (playing God, 7 days, "A Man" / Amen cadence), heterosexual panic around...
 
"I Can Make You a Man"
52
Doo-wop progression, "message" of film, Esther Williams
 
"Don't Dream It: Be It"
53
stage mom
 
Gypsy (Gypsy Rose Lee) (Sondheim, Styne, Laurents, 1959)
54
title as both daughter and mother (use of paired numbers)
 
Gypsy (Gypsy Rose Lee) (Sondheim, Styne, Laurents, 1959)
55
theme: vaudeville/burlesque decline
 
Gypsy (Gypsy Rose Lee) (Sondheim, Styne, Laurents, 1959)
56
theme: mother-child issues
 
Gypsy (Gypsy Rose Lee) (Sondheim, Styne, Laurents, 1959)
57
theme: gender
 
Gypsy (Gypsy Rose Lee) (Sondheim, Styne, Laurents, 1959)
58
theme: American Dream
 
Gypsy (Gypsy Rose Lee) (Sondheim, Styne, Laurents,...
59
cute kid's song later becomes part of Gypsy's "gimmick" as stripper (a kind...
 
"Let Me (May We) Entertain You"
60
"Hello, my name is..."
 
"Baby June & Her Newsboys"
61
tricks, climb (risque meanings)
 
"Baby June & Her Newsboys"
62
first when Baby June leaves, introduces triplets, recalled in "Rose's Turn"
 
"Everything's Coming Up Roses"
63
Sondeheim compiled
 
"Roses's Turn"
64
after "Gypsy Rose Lee" is successful, Mama Rose is on her own; breakdown
 
"Roses's Turn"
65
applause problem
 
"Roses's Turn"
66
music as revealer of inside
 
Once More, With Feeling (Buffy, Joss Whedon, 2001)
67
fire as inner spark: dangerous but needed
 
Once More, With Feeling (Buffy, Joss Whedon, 2001)
68
magic to ideal to sex (outside to inside; inside; inside to outside)
 
Once More, With Feeling (Buffy, Joss Whedon, 2001)
69
Buffy: routine as routine (no spark)
 
"Going Trhough the Motions"
70
Tara & Willow: magic to ideal to sex
 
"Under Your Spell"
71
Sweet (demon): the demon within that he lets out, through music
 
"What You Feel"
72
multi-persepctives (WSS's "Tonight")
 
"Walk Through The Fire"
73
inspiration as shared idealism
 
"Walk Through The Fire"
74
Buffy needs spark (eventually provided by Spike)
 
"Give Me Something to Sing About"
75
White's Once and future King (1958, but from late 1930s)
 
Camelot (Lerner & Loewe, 1960)
76
transition from operetta (fairy tale) to idealistic (adult)
 
Camelot (Lerner & Loewe, 1960)
77
chain of songs, each providing seed for next song
 
Camelot (Lerner & Loewe, 1960)
78
reality of ideal (Lancelot) unravels ideal, structure like Into the Woods: happily...
 
Camelot (Lerner & Loewe, 1960)
79
tropes of magic (octatonic scale) & primitive heroic (fanfares in parallel chords)
 
Overture (Camelot)
80
Provides material for "Where are the Simple Joys of Maidenhood?"
 
"I Know What My People Are Thinking Tonight"
81
parallel to "I Know"
 
"Where are the Simple Joys of Maidenhood?"
82
provides material for "Camelot"
 
"Where are the Simple Joys of Maidenhood?"
83
transition from fairy tale to idealsim (reprise leads to "C'est Moi")
 
"Camelot"
84
Lancelot as embodied ideal (a problem!)
 
"C'est Moi"
85
ostinato as fate: rality catches up
 
"Guenevere"
86
pantomime & sound bites: newsreel effect
 
"Guenevere"
87
ideal lives on in stories
 
"Finale: Camelot"
88
mosaic approach in intertwined fairy tales
 
Into the Woods (Sondheim, 1987)
89
after "ever after" (responsibility, unraveling, loss of narrative frame)
 
Into the Woods (Sondheim, 1987)
90
Act I as solving problems by going "into the woods"
 
Into the Woods (Sondheim, 1987)
91
Act II as dealing with problematic solutions, paying hidden costs, reconsidering
 
 Into the Woods (Sondheim, 1987)
92
setting up animating impulses (individual quests)
 
"Into the Woods"
93
"I wish"
 
"Into the Woods"
94
Red Riding Hood's "precessing" number
 
"I Know Things Now"
95
"nice" vs. "good"
 
"I Know Things Now"
96
Act I finale: all problems solved (or are they?)
 
"Ever After"
97
2 Princes reconsider: in Act I the agony of not having, Act II the agony of having + wanting...
 
"Agony"
98
reconsidering meanings, comfort, but also responsibility
 
"No One Is Alone"
99
reconsidering meanings: Chlidren won't listen becomes "children will listen":...
 
"Finale (Children Will Listen)"
100
response to Disney's Snow White (1937)
 
The Wizard of Oz (Arlen and Harburg, 1939)
101
different meanings, depending on perspective: camp, children's lit (young girl in trouble),...
 
The Wizard of Oz (Arlen and Harburg, 1939)
102
doubleness, especially attractions of Oz AND safety of home
 
The Wizard of Oz (Arlen and Harburg, 1939)
103
Oz as empowerment
 
The Wizard of Oz (Arlen and Harburg, 1939)
104
Oz as scary (near-death experience)
 
The Wizard of Oz (Arlen and Harburg, 1939)
105
framed as narrative film
 
The Wizard of Oz (Arlen and Harburg, 1939)
106
tendency toward short songs
 
The Wizard of Oz (Arlen and Harburg, 1939)
107
only song in Kansas, reaches up to rainbow, pulls it in, MERM as quiet
 
"Over the Rainbow"
108
short, ditty-like songs of Munchkinland, possible gay readings ("if any")
 
"As Mayor of the Munchkin City"/"As Coronor, I Must Aver"
109
collecting FoD: all have something "different" (pointing toward homosexuality)
 
"If I Only Had..."
110
parody of opera
 
"If I Were King of the Forest"
111
possible gay readings
 
"If I Were King of the Forest"
112
Baz Luhrmann
 
Moulin Rouge (2001)
113
over-the-top MERM
 
Moulin Rouge (2001)
114
conflation of Orpheus & La Traviata / La Boheme
 
Moulin Rouge (2001)
115
significance of AIDS references & homosexual dimension
 
Moulin Rouge (2001)
116
doublness of camp: romantic and hilarious
 
Moulin Rouge (2001)
117
Bohemian virtues: truth, beauty, freedom, love
 
Moulin Rouge (2001)
118
basis in known songs (songs of our day) rather than period songs
 
Moulin Rouge (2001)
119
often significant sources for songs
 
Moulin Rouge (2001)
120
vagabond Ahbez
 
"Nature Boy" (Ahbez)
121
free-floating waltz idiom
 
"Nature Boy" (Ahbez)
122
source of key line: "The greatest thing you'll ever learn / Is just to love and be...
 
"Nature Boy" (Ahbez)
123
first "Orpheus moment"
 
"The Sound of Music" (Rodgers and Hammerstein)
124
second "Orpheus moment": "My gift is my song" / "How wonderful life...
 
"Your Song" (Taupin & John)
125
Tango as fate and obsession
 
"Tango de Roxanne" (Sting, Mores, Luhrmann, & Pearce)
126
visual and musical counterpoint (montage) building to violence
 
"Tango de Roxanne" (Sting, Mores, Luhrmann, & Pearce)
127
circumstances of source song (Mercury and AIDS) visual motive (striding forward)
 
"The Show Must Go On" (Mercury, May, Taylor & Deacon)
128
operatta trope of "secret song"
 
"Come What May" (Baerwald)
129
allows spiritual rescue, redemptive love
 
"Come What May" (Baerwald)
130
wodden acting, but deliberate plotting: displace and reclaim black traditions from minstrelsy...
 
Stormy Weather (1943)
131
background (Blacks in Hollywood, WWII)
 
Stormy Weather (1943)
132
minstrel tropes
 
Stormy Weather (1943)
133
jungle tropes (Bojangles Robinson in war paint dancing on drums)
 
Stormy Weather (1943)
134
19th- Century basis, caricature bonnets
 
"Cakewalk"
135
Ada Brown & Fats Waller
 
"That Ain't Right" (Cole and Mills)
136
undermining blues
 
"That Ain't Right" (Cole and Mills)
137
Fats Waller "mincing" & flirting
 
"Aint' Misbehivin'"
138
Lena Horne, Katherine Dunham
 
"Stormy Weather" (Arlen and Koehler)
139
tradition of "strom aria" (storm inside= storm outside)
 
"Stormy Weather" (Arlen and Koehler)
140
storm motives slowed down (sad, yet sexy)
 
"Stormy Weather" (Arlen and Koehler)
141
Black ballet troupe
 
"Stormy Weather" (Arlen and Koehler)
142
Cab Calloway
 
"Jumpin' Jive" (Calloway and Palmer)
143
Jive talk
 
"Jumpin' Jive" (Calloway and Palmer)
144
call/response
 
"Jumpin' Jive" (Calloway and Palmer)
145
scat singing
 
"Jumpin' Jive" (Calloway and Palmer)
146
showcase dance routine by Nicholas Brothers (splits stairways, outdoing Bojangles, displacing...
 
"Jumpin' Jive" (Calloway and Palmer)
147
Comden & Green
 
Singin' in the Rain (Freed and Brown, 1952)
148
basis in history
 
Singin' in the Rain (Freed and Brown, 1952)
149
theme of body doubles, voice doubles
 
Singin' in the Rain (Freed and Brown, 1952)
150
MERM
 
Singin' in the Rain (Freed and Brown, 1952)
151
"Buddy" film
 
Singin' in the Rain (Freed and Brown, 1952)
152
songs from period
 
Singin' in the Rain (Freed and Brown, 1952)
153
truth & lies
 
"Fit as a Fiddle"
154
MERM
 
"You Were Meant for Me"
155
triangle situation
 
"Good Mornin'"
156
Cyd Charise as body-double
 
"Broadway Ballet"
157
Louise Brooks look
 
"Broadway Ballet"
158
sexuality
 
"Broadway Ballet"
159
Vegas-like Broadway
 
"Broadway Ballet"
160
perspective, all-Asian (and mostly male) cast, mixes of musical, verbal, and theatrical styles,...
 
"Pacific Overtures" (Weidman, Prince, Sondheim 1976)
161
based more closely on history (corrective to The King and I and others)
 
"Pacific Overtures" (Weidman, Prince, Sondheim 1976)
162
Japan as floating, circular, primitive, static
 
"The Advantages of Floating the the Middle of the Sea"
163
ref. "Tradition" (Fiddler on the Roof): starting point that will undergo change
 
"The Advantages of Floating the the Middle of the Sea"
164
Haikku-like exchange of poems, gradually adding syllables, mapping America to a beloved
 
"Poems"
165
gentle song about violence: "Washing yesterday away, America"
 
"Poems"
166
context: one beloved (wife) shamed to suicide, the otehr (America) will betray trust
 
"Poems"
167
history as mosaic, never completely observed
 
"Someone in  a Tree"
168
pastiche of nations (America/Sousa; English/Gilbert and Sullivan, Dutch wooden shoe, Russian...
 
"Please Hello"
169
larger metaphor of imperialsm as cutlural rape (ref. "Please Hello")
 
"Pretty Lady"
170
lyrical violence, blend of styles, Western lament figure, imitative counterpoint
 
"Pretty Lady"
171
"oreintal" sound
 
"Pretty Lady"
172
Japanese version of Broadway cockneys
 
"Pretty Lady"
173
finale: Primitivism into industrialism, the sound of corporate America
 
"Next"
174
pride of survival instead of tradition
 
"Next"
175
film 1956, 1944 novel, falsifying memoir 1870/1872
 
"The King and I" (Rodgers & Hammerstein, 1951)
176
Yul Brynner
 
"The King and I" (Rodgers & Hammerstein, 1951)
177
Gertrude Lawrence
 
"The King and I" (Rodgers & Hammerstein, 1951)
178
Jerome Robbins
 
"The King and I" (Rodgers & Hammerstein, 1951)
179
no Asians among leads
 
"The King and I" (Rodgers & Hammerstein, 1951)
180
gets history wrong (banned in Thailand). 
 
"The King and I" (Rodgers & Hammerstein, 1951)
181
Real Story: Siam isolated from 1688, pressure to allow European trade in mid-19th-century,...
 
"The King and I" (Rodgers & Hammerstein, 1951)
182
In show: American parallels (slavery, Uncle Tom's Cabin, civilizing [feminizing])...
 
"The King and I" (Rodgers & Hammerstein, 1951)
183
Issues: gender, Orientalism, slavery (Moses), race
 
"The King and I" (Rodgers & Hammerstein, 1951)
184
perspective
 
"The King and I" (Rodgers & Hammerstein, 1951)
185
"orientalist" music (not authentic)
 
"The King and I" (Rodgers & Hammerstein, 1951)
186
displaces scary chanting of Siamese, primativist repeated-note motive
 
"Whistle a Happy Tune"
187
Orientalizing music: instruments, pentatonicism
 
"March of the Siamese Children"
188
knowledge as uncertainty, the "primative" & the "childlike"
 
"Is a Puzzlement"
189
possiblity of union: powerful but dangerous, fear trust, who leads
 
"Shall we Dance"
190
note: Polka, not waltz (faster, more powerful movement)
 
"Shall we Dance"


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